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Thread: PEAR or ADOdb

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up PEAR or ADOdb

    there is an extension in PHP called PEAR, where we no longer need to connect to the DB using mysql_connect() but with
    the embedded function such as DB:connect(), one of the main advantage is the ease of implementation if we want to change the db from mysql into Oracle....saves a lot of implementation time to rewrite!

    I want to know the comparison of PEAR to ADOdb, which one is better to implement by their performance, functionality?

    thanks

  • #2
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    whilst not being a big fan of PEAR (in general) ... or any abstraction layer for DB work I suspect that PEAR may win in the long run as `THE` DB layer though not because it is any better ... possibly the opposite...

    I would suggest you think about writing seperate Database classes for each database you think you may ever require, some DB abstractions can work, but to get an abstration layer that works from the bottom to the top of the scale often gives very poor, innefficient code , want proof ... look at PEAR

    In general, if you think you will be able to port a MySQL app to Oracle then you probably have problems ahead aside from SQL syntax which is hard to write for both, Oracle requires a totally different methodology to get the best out of compared to MySQL inless you are only using Oracle at the same level as MySQL in which case stick to MySQL cos its faster and cheaper
    resistance is...

    MVC is the current buzz in web application architectures. It comes from event-driven desktop application design and doesn't fit into web application design very well. But luckily nobody really knows what MVC means, so we can call our presentation layer separation mechanism MVC and move on. (Rasmus Lerdorf)


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