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  1. #1
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    Macintosh compatibility

    Can someone please tell me what is required to make the current html pages that you have seen compatible with the Mac.

    Is there any changes or considerations you need to make

    Thanks.

  • #2
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    Bah?
    Do you mean is HTML different for macs?
    If so; no, it isn't.

    I take no responsibility for the above nonsense.


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  • #3
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    I know there are some differences as some websites check the operating system and browser before processing or displaying information?

    Surely the must be some compatibilty issues with mac's on the internet

  • #4
    Senior Coder Nightfire's Avatar
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    I know there are some differences as some websites check the operating system and browser before processing or displaying information?
    The ones that do that are usually poorly coded. If you code properly you have no problems with different OS's

  • #5
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    Originally posted by Nightfire
    I know there are some differences as some websites check the operating system and browser before processing or displaying information?
    The ones that do that are usually poorly coded. If you code properly you have no problems with different OS's
    But that is exactly what i want to know.

    What makes a poorly coded website or one that isnt compatible with macs

    cheers

  • #6
    Senior Coder Nightfire's Avatar
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    About 99% of the time, if you code to the standards specified by w3c then you should have no problems with anything, apart from a few hacks for IE.

    http://validator.w3.org/

  • #7
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    yes, I use a mac for everything and code all of my pages with it... there's only a few browser differences as far as CSS support (IE for mac, Safari, Camino), but other than that, html is rendered the same.

    -Rich

  • #8
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    Image differences on a Mac

    I have noticed that images on a mac are lighter but that's more of a problem for those of us designing on a mac (you create a picture that looks great only to see that on a PC it's much darker, sometimes too dark.)

    Another issue I've noticed is that if you set an open browser window behaviour to open an image (insted of a page), on a mac (IE5) the image sits at the top LH corner but on a PC running IE6 there's a margin at left & top.

  • #9
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    Re: Image differences on a Mac

    Originally posted by kita
    I have noticed that images on a mac are lighter but that's more of a problem for those of us designing on a mac (you create a picture that looks great only to see that on a PC it's much darker, sometimes too dark.)
    This has little to do with OS, and more to do with colour profiles.
    Mac OS lets you specify an RGB colour space using Colour Sync (.ICM profile) which is displayed all the time. ie; you can easily tweak your monitor's colour and rely on it displaying the same. This profile is also what you would (hopefully) use in Photoshop as your default RGB colour space. PC's on the other hand, only apply the "Adobe Gamma" (that's as close as we get to ColourSync) to images in Photoshop. Our general OS is an uncontrolled colour space!
    The problem is further exaspirated by designing on LCD's and viewing later on CRT's. Due to the pathetic contrast ratio of CRT's compared to LCD/TFT, images always seem darker and less vibrant on a CRT.
    Lesson:
    1. Create a colour profile, taking into account the lighting that is around your monitor (none of us actually use pure daylight fluro's. Most good ones are around 5500k).
    2. Set it in Photoshop as your default working space (you'll need to tick Advanced Options in Colour Management to select a user defined colour profile).
    3. Convert all imported images with embeded profiles to your profile; save all files with your profile embeded.

    Well, talk about off-topic! Can you tell I come from a print background?

    Andrew

    I take no responsibility for the above nonsense.


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