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  1. #1
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    Do you guys code with HTML5?

    Just wondering? I guess the inhibitor is browser acceptance.

    Solution is to look at your stats and see what OS and version of IE, FF, Opera, Safari etc that visitors people are using.

    Do you guys all use HTML5 w/out issues?

  • #2
    Regular Coder Custard7A's Avatar
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    I have the benefit of a selective audience, all young people with a moderate understanding of browsers. In my case I'm happy to give browsers I consider outdated the shaft (Recommend a browser update, don't load the site), even IE 8, and I don't have problems with my users. I use the most solid aspects of HTML 5 that I feel I won't be changed (much) in the future, without any issues. If you need to cater for older browsers — many people have this need — then you probably shouldn't be using something that is still in working draft; You'll end up causing yourself a lot of headaches, and probably code half your site twice. Sorry, that's the simple truth.

  • #3
    Master Coder felgall's Avatar
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    The inhibitor as far as I am concerned is that it is not yet a standard. Proposed web standards have a history of changing dramatically before they become a standard (consider IE5's implementation of a draft version of CSS 2 - now known as quirks mode). With all the duplications and unnecessary tags currently proposed for HTML 5 it is obvious that they will not all survive into the standard.

    For an example of an unnecessary tag - the death of IE6 finally did away with any need for the embed tag by those incapable of nesting two object tags. Why introduce a tag when its reason for existing is long gone?

    Another example - the introduction of the pattern attribute for input fields in HTML 5 makes the required attribute obsolete. While both are retained it is possible to define a field as required and must be empty at the same time.

    These will presumably be fixed before HTML 5 becomes a standard.It will then need to be given a proper doctype as the one it currently uses as a draft is equally valid for HTML 2 (which is reasonable for a draft but not for the final standard - after all you need a way to distinguish pages following the current draft (quirks mode two) from those following the final standard.
    Last edited by felgall; 11-08-2012 at 06:49 PM.
    Stephen
    Learn Modern JavaScript - http://javascriptexample.net/
    Helping others to solve their computer problem at http://www.felgall.com/

    Don't forget to start your JavaScript code with "use strict"; which makes it easier to find errors in your code.

  • #4
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    I use html5 for "hobby" type sites, where it really doesn't matter much if I lose a viewer. But for sites that are important business sites, html 4.01 strict.

    Dave

  • #5
    The fat guy next door VIPStephan's Avatar
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    I’m not usually making any major use of HTML 5 specific functions just yet. And if I’m using the most common HTML 5 elements like <article> or <section> I’m not doing anything with them in terms of styling or manipulation and I’m still sometimes wrapping them with a regular div element if I need to style or manipulate them, for exactly those browsers that do not know these elements. My style of working is to cater for most potential users with the least necessary effort. I see no joy in implementing premature and half-baked experimental features just because it’s possible, and then either ignoring people just because they don’t have the latest cutting-edge technology to make use of these experimental features or negligently implementing equally half-baked workarounds (such as “modernizer” type JavaScripts) just to emulate the latest cutting-edge experimental features in older browsers. The same counts for many CSS 3 features.

  • #6
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    Right so the message im getting is that its better to be safe than sorry....


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