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  1. #1
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    Best Way To (Re-)Learn HTML

    Firstly, a couple of people might remember me for first starting to ask questions in the JavaScript section of the forum. Here I am, though, trying to re-learn my HTML. The reason I want to do this is because I feel that when I first started to learn the two, I had really no structure to my learning, and it was just a case of pick up and go.

    I'm afraid that this approach may have caused me to miss out on a lot, though, so I want to start afresh, learning everything from the bottom up, and learning best-practice code.

    i've been trying to do this for a while, but my problem is that I can't find the right learning resources. My preffered method of learning was to learn with good old books on the subject, but many of the books I have been recommended are quite old (the first and apparently only edition of Head-First HTML with CSS and XHTML, a book recommended by many it would seem, was published in 2005 - I presume this is old for the web development world, maybe you can tell me if it is or isn't?), and the problem with online tutorials is that they seem to be so short and not really in-depth enough to learn from.

    So if anyone knows of a good and in-depth online resource/tutorial to learn HTML with this, or a good and recent book to learn from, both of which teach best-practice code from the outset and explain things well, please do recommend some - it really would be so much appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Hashim
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  • #2
    Master Coder felgall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hashim1 View Post
    (the first and apparently only edition of Head-First HTML with CSS and XHTML, a book recommended by many it would seem, was published in 2005 - I presume this is old for the web development world, maybe you can tell me if it is or isn't?)
    There has been no reason for a second edition of that book. It covers HTML 4 and XHTML 1.0 properly and those are still the latest standard.

    HTML 5 is still at the preliminary "let's try out lots of new rtags and see which ones work and which ones don't" stage where there will be lots of changes made to the draft before it gets anywhere near the first alpha release.

    Anyway, HTML 5 just adds new tags and attributes to HTML 4 / XHTML 1.0 and so you'd need to know the current part since that's what you'd be using most of the time even once HTML 5 does eventually become the new standard.
    Stephen
    Learn Modern JavaScript - http://javascriptexample.net/
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    Don't forget to start your JavaScript code with "use strict"; which makes it easier to find errors in your code.

  • #3
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    Honestly, there isn't much to HTML... which is probably why you're unable to find anything 'deep' or challenging. CSS is where the challenging part is on front end. My HTML could be less than one page and then the CSS be multiple.

  • #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by felgall View Post
    There has been no reason for a second edition of that book. It covers HTML 4 and XHTML 1.0 properly and those are still the latest standard.

    HTML 5 is still at the preliminary "let's try out lots of new rtags and see which ones work and which ones don't" stage where there will be lots of changes made to the draft before it gets anywhere near the first alpha release.

    Anyway, HTML 5 just adds new tags and attributes to HTML 4 / XHTML 1.0 and so you'd need to know the current part since that's what you'd be using most of the time even once HTML 5 does eventually become the new standard.
    Quote Originally Posted by KULP View Post
    Honestly, there isn't much to HTML... which is probably why you're unable to find anything 'deep' or challenging. CSS is where the challenging part is on front end. My HTML could be less than one page and then the CSS be multiple.
    So, I'd be fine using that book? Hm, I'll have to look into getting hold of that then. Just I assumed since it was published in 2006 it was quite old, hence the reason I didn't originally want to get it. Thanks for that.
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  • #5
    Master Coder felgall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hashim1 View Post
    So, I'd be fine using that book? Hm, I'll have to look into getting hold of that then. Just I assumed since it was published in 2006 it was quite old, hence the reason I didn't originally want to get it. Thanks for that.
    The current HTML standard has been around since 1997 and the vast majority of web sites are using a doctype that indicates that they still haven't finished transitioning from the prior version. The book teaches HTML 4 while most of the web is still written using HTML 3.2 (usually using a transitional doctype to indicate that they have started to transition to HTML 4 but haven't yet finished and so cannot change to the strict doctype that indicates that they only use HTML 4).
    Stephen
    Learn Modern JavaScript - http://javascriptexample.net/
    Helping others to solve their computer problem at http://www.felgall.com/

    Don't forget to start your JavaScript code with "use strict"; which makes it easier to find errors in your code.

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    I'd recommend you learn to code HTML 4.01 Strict and CSS3 before diving into HTML5, Javascript, and other more advanced languages. I personally am learning through different books including Head First and Visual Quickstart. They're pretty good resources to give you a solid foundation in the core code.

    Other than that - use Google to answer questions. You would be surprised what Google can teach you with a simple search term. Registering on various web developer forums is also a good decision.

  • #7
    Master Coder felgall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tinytomhanks View Post
    I recommend a online resource w3school.com.
    Why do you recommend that site? The two guys who created it took on so many topics that they are unable to keep any of them up to date. There are many other far more professionally run sites around that cover the material and are more up to date but who didn't buy domain names with w3 on the front of the name.

    The HTMLO section of the site isn't too bad since HTML 4 has been around for 15 years now. The JavaScript section is the worst and mostly shows how to write JavaScript for Netscape 4 and earlier browsers.
    Stephen
    Learn Modern JavaScript - http://javascriptexample.net/
    Helping others to solve their computer problem at http://www.felgall.com/

    Don't forget to start your JavaScript code with "use strict"; which makes it easier to find errors in your code.

  • #8
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    I learned using the text recommended by a class on the subject at the local college. It is Visual Quickstart Guide HTML, XHTML, AND CSS Sixth Edition by Elizabeth Castro.

    I was a complete beginner when I picked it up, and was creating and selling websites in no time! I highly recommend it.


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