Hello,

I have written an electronic grammar guide for reviewing student drafts in MS Word XP and 2007, and would like to make an improvement to it that I’m hoping someone here can help me with:

I use hyperlinks to bookmarks within the guide document. For example, a typical paragraph might look like this; the all-caps expression would be a link:

The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever, < COMMA SPLICE PROBLEM the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever.

The link above will take the reader to the bookmarked information in the guide, which runs as follows (the all-caps phrase would be the bookmark):

COMMA SPLICE PROBLEM: A comma splice occurs when a writer fails to place a conjunction or semicolon between independent clauses (clauses that could stand as complete sentences): “This is my worst error, I cannot stop making it.” Correction: “This is my worst error because I cannot stop making it” or “This is my worst error; I cannot stop making it.” Run-ons are similar except that they have no punctuation at all between the clauses: “Run-ons are my worst problem I can’t stop writing them.”

So far, so good. But it would be better still if clicking on the bookmark at the bottom returned the viewer back to the precise location of the most recent hyperlink click. This would be easy if there were only one hyperlink in the entire document leading to the bookmark. But oftentimes, the same grammar problem recurs – if a student makes five comma-splice mistakes, I then have several hyperlinks in the draft pointing to the same bookmark in the guide (both the draft and the guide are in the same document), as in the following example – three separate paragraphs with the same grammar mistake:

The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever, < COMMA SPLICE PROBLEM the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever.

The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever, < COMMA SPLICE PROBLEM the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever.

The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever, < COMMA SPLICE PROBLEM the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy golden retriever.

They above links all point to the single bookmark below, but how do I code the bookmark so that clicking on it will take students back to the hyperlink they most recently clicked? That’s the best place to return them, of course, because it’s the exact spot in the draft from which they would want to resume reading.

COMMA SPLICE PROBLEM: A comma splice occurs when a writer fails to place a conjunction or semicolon between independent clauses (clauses that could stand as complete sentences): “This is my worst error, I cannot stop making it.” Correction: “This is my worst error because I cannot stop making it” or “This is my worst error; I cannot stop making it.” Run-ons are similar except that they have no punctuation at all between the clauses: “Run-ons are my worst problem I can’t stop writing them.”

Thanks for any help with crafting the necessary code!