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  1. #1
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    Question I am visually impaired and therefore apprehensive about CSS.

    I am probably the only, if not one of the few, blind Web coders here. I've spent the past year or so learning HTML, and I feel confident in that language. Now, the online tutorial I've been using has an entire section on CSS. I think I could get the basics of actually writing style sheets, but there's just one thing that makes me the slightest bit hesitant about starting my actual CSS page. The simple fact that I'm visually impaired would prevent me from being able to see what the CSS code would make the page look like in the browser. This is why I haven't started putting CSS in action yet; I'm not sure I would be able to make just the right style for my pages. So, how in the world do I do this? How am I supposed to give a page a good CSS design if I can't see that design? Any advice would be greatly appreciated; don't be afraid to reply and post your suggestions. Thank you.

  • #2
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    Since CSS is a visual method. I can't think of a way you could without someone coming up with software that would audibly alert you to things. Such as sizing divs by the pitch of a tone. Then there would have to be a similar method to placing elements on a page but how would you ever know if it looked pleasing?

    Of course, if all you wanted to do was color elements, that would be much simpler but the question still remains, how do you know what looks pleasing?

    What is the topic of your site? Is it just family stuff?

  • #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cfm518 View Post
    I am probably the only, if not one of the few, blind Web coders here. I've spent the past year or so learning HTML, and I feel confident in that language. Now, the online tutorial I've been using has an entire section on CSS. I think I could get the basics of actually writing style sheets, but there's just one thing that makes me the slightest bit hesitant about starting my actual CSS page. The simple fact that I'm visually impaired would prevent me from being able to see what the CSS code would make the page look like in the browser. This is why I haven't started putting CSS in action yet; I'm not sure I would be able to make just the right style for my pages. So, how in the world do I do this? How am I supposed to give a page a good CSS design if I can't see that design? Any advice would be greatly appreciated; don't be afraid to reply and post your suggestions. Thank you.
    as far as your html markup and content is semantic structured attaching styling after a given pattern will make this task more easy. Of course will be more difficult for you to know how realy looks but I guess you can get help with this by posting your sites in forums for reviews.
    Unfortunately today technology can solve a lot of stupid and useless problems and make people to think that everything is possible but can't solve a problem like yours.

    best regards

  • #4
    Regular Coder jamesicus's Avatar
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    James Gallagher, a good friend of mine, is deafblind from birth and and has composed and published several web pages with minimal inline styling. (I worked with him on some of those). James is always eager to help other people with similar disabilities in producing web pages. Please contact him for he has many unique insights -- his e-mail address is on his primary web site which is well worth a visit due to the wealth of information it contains relating to web accessibility for people who are blind and deafblind:

    A-Z Deafblindness

    James
    Last edited by jamesicus; 02-20-2009 at 06:01 PM. Reason: changed style sheet information
    Web Developer Tool Kit - for creating Standards compliant and Interoperable web pages
    W3C Markup Validation Service - validate HTML code for reliable rendering in all Browsers
    WAVE accessibility evaluation tool - check page structure, image alt text, form labels, etc.

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    cfm518 (02-20-2009)

  • #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by drhowarddrfine View Post
    Since CSS is a visual method. I can't think of a way you could without someone coming up with software that would audibly alert you to things. Such as sizing divs by the pitch of a tone. Then there would have to be a similar method to placing elements on a page but how would you ever know if it looked pleasing?
    I do have a screen reader that is capable of telling me about the colors, fonts and other things on a Web page with just a keystroke, but as you said, it wouldn't really help me as a designer because I wouldn't know how it looked. That's my main trouble here.


    Of course, if all you wanted to do was color elements, that would be much simpler but the question still remains, how do you know what looks pleasing?
    True.


    What is the topic of your site? Is it just family stuff?
    Well, if this helps any, it's a fan site for a music group...as if there aren't already enough of those around, but that's what I'm making it about. Also, in January, I went to a place where I took a computer class, among others, and once the instructor learned of my skills in HTML, he wanted me to start a website for the facility. Of course, that one would need an entirely different look from a fan community.

    Quote Originally Posted by oesxyl
    as far as your html markup and content is semantic structured attaching styling after a given pattern will make this task more easy. Of course will be more difficult for you to know how realy looks but I guess you can get help with this by posting your sites in forums for reviews.
    Well, I don't have it up on the Internet yet, but maybe I could post a few code snipits?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesicus

    James Gallagher, a good friend of mine, is deafblind from birth and and has composed and published several web pages but without employing CSS (I worked with him on some of those). James is always eager to help other people with similar disabilities in producing web pages. Please contact him for he has many unique insights -- his e-mail address is on his primary web site which is well worth a visit due to the wealth of information it contains relating to web accessibility for people who are blind and deafblind:
    Thank you for the link. I'll check out his website. By the way, I gave you a "thanks" for that post.

  • #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by cfm518 View Post
    Well, I don't have it up on the Internet yet, but maybe I could post a few code snipits?
    why not if this can help you.

    best regards

  • #7
    Regular Coder jamesicus's Avatar
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    Dear cfm518:

    Please check out my Web Content Accessibility page.

    As I mention there, at one time I was the Senior Technical Advisor (volunteer) for Access World Design and Development, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to the training and employment of the disabled in accessible web design. We had members who were severely disabled (Deafblind or with respirator dependent Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy) who we trained to become independently proficient Web authors. It was a most rewarding experience and I remain committed to Web Content Accessibility to this day. I will be only to happy to answer any questions you may have or to assist in any other way.

    James
    Web Developer Tool Kit - for creating Standards compliant and Interoperable web pages
    W3C Markup Validation Service - validate HTML code for reliable rendering in all Browsers
    WAVE accessibility evaluation tool - check page structure, image alt text, form labels, etc.

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    cfm518 (02-20-2009)

  • #8
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    I am reading your page right now. You have some pretty interesting stuff.

    And I use Statcounter for my message boards!


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