I am trying to design an intranet (meaning I will have control over what gets installed on the client PCs) web-application, and for one of the steps, I was wanting the user to be able to print out a label with a barcode on it. I already know that the printer should be able to print labels even without using the printer-specific label-making software; on a different project, I had the system make up an .rtf file, send it over to the print station, and have the user open the file in WordPad and print it out on the label-printer. I already have a True-type barcode font that I wish to use and will be able to install onto each of the PCs. So I guess I'm wondering whether I would just use the font-family specification in CSS and as long as the computer has that font installed, it should display and print correctly? E.G.:
Code:
<p style="font-family: 'free 3-of-9 barcode', fantasy"> *This becomes a barcode* <\p>
I'm assuming too that I could write the text normally and the font would take care of converting it to the correct glyphs. Also, would I need to include the generic-family if I know that the computers will have the actual font-family. The W3C says one should always include the generic-family at the end, but I'm wondering if this is more because the coder can't be sure that a user viewing an external internet page would have the correct font-family installed, and that in my particular case since I will be controling what fonts are installed, a generic-family becomes unnecessary.

And I know this would be a simple question to just test for myself, but I'm going to be away from the server so I thought I'd ask anyay and perhaps get some help before I'm back to the server.