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  1. #1
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    Photoshop print quality

    Ok so I have look at the support page on adobe site. I looked in help and no luck.

    I bought a new cannon printer. I saw the photo qualty at the store.

    I bought matte canon paper. I print the page and put the properties on the highest setting and they are not clear. the image is good but the print is bad. I did play with some setting color mode,etc. One print out came better but still reall bad.

    New ink and matte paper and they are not coming out very good at all. Do I need to export the image to something else. I have pagemaker, office, photoshop 5.5 and 6 on my pc. Running win 98.

    I did look before I posted. I would even be up for some helpful links if people are busy... thanks

  • #2
    Regular Coder Feyd's Avatar
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    When you open the image in PS, what do you see in the Resolution properties (right click on the titlebar of the image, then go to IMAGE SIZE. the window will tell you what the Resolution is. If it is around 72, then the print quality will always suck. That is web resolution. For a good quality print, you need to have resolution in the 200-300 range (DPI or PPI)).

    Also, the size of an image in pixels is different than inches. If your image is at a resolution of 100 PPI, that basically means it will take 100 pixels to fill up one inch of space. So you'd need a 1200 pixel wide image to print a 12 inch wide shot. If you are printing an image that was strictly made as a web-based image, you simply aren't going to get enough pixel information to fill a high quality print (the image tries to fill itself with pixel information, when it needs to, which is why low resolution images look so bad). The higher the resolution, the more information per pixel, the better the print...

    If that isn't it, also remember it takes a few major prints for most printers to get toned down to their natural state (depending on the printer).

    And remember, you can't just change a 72 DPI image and tell it to be 200 DPI, you are basically telling it to make up (lie) about the other 128 DPI...the image guesses what should fill that data in, and the blur comes back. The image needs to have the information already contained within it.
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  • #3
    Senior Coder
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    ideas

    I've been in the print world for about five years, and here's what I think:

    1. If the image looks ok on your monitor, that doesn't mean it'll print ok. Your bubble printer will print CMYK ink, your monitor is RGB. Often times, what I think looks good, does not when it prints. For my work, I color calibrate all the printers and the monitors together... this is a costly thing, however, and not the best thing for you. The same problem you have is what we deal with everyday and you can do this:

    Go to the support site for you printer, and see if they have any .icc profiles (they are a little file to download). This will adjust your image everytime you print to your printer, so that it prints a really nice 'curve'. Making the image a lot smoother, and will probably fix your problem. If you post the full make and model, I can show you where to download it, and then walk you through the install and how to apply the profile to your photoshop document.

    2. Feyd is right about the resolution -- very important to printing. You don't need to do 300 dpi, however -- the math is this: whatever resolution your printer says it can print, divide it by two for screenprinters -- multiply it by two for desktop printing, and you will have what your file should be set up as. There is a longer equation for this that's more exact, but this'll do for the meantime. But, like Feyd said, you cannot bump up a horrible image, into a better image.

    3. Bubble jet printers were the worst thing ever created for the design industry. They don't dry well, the paper sucks, and the quality is no where near what is needed for designers. Often times when you view what the people demonstrate, it is because they use their own 'photo' that they made specifically to print. Technique, when you go to buy your printer next time, bring your own image on a disk and ask them to print it. See if it works as well.

    finally - the problem is not the program, it is how the printer reads the color and outputs it. If you have further problems, email me -- otherwise, the company that you bought the printer from (HP, Xerox, etc.) will be more than happy to give you support if you explain how bad it sucks.

    Does this help? Drop me a line if you have any questions.


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