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  1. #1
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    How much bandwidth should I be expecting to use?

    Myself and the company I work for have been using a private e-commerce platform for quite some time, and have recently had a number of issues regarding the bandwidth we use.

    We exceeded the 50GB bandwidth given to us by our host, and so were given 100GB (at a cost). We are now being told we are likely to exceed this again this month (which will of course cost us more money).

    After looking closer at the our website (pinknoise - systems . co. uk) I realised that when looking at the grid of products in a category, the "thumbnails" of the products were actually the full-sized images force-resized on display, instead of PHP-generated genuine thumbnails.

    While the e-commerce platforms developers did put a thumbnail-generator in place, which brought down the page sizes quite a bit, we've still been told we're likely to go over 100GB this month.

    So, my question is - How much bandwidth should we be expecting to use each month? Looking at alternatives platforms eg: Magento, Bluepark etc. I see that "large businesses" are given around 40-50GB per month in bandwidth.

    We are only a small company (5 staff), and get around 50-60,000 page views per month. Please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but surely there is something uneconomic in either the website's coding/structure or the way we have it set out, that is making us use so much bandwidth each month?!

    I would really, really appreciate some assistance with this one, as we're trying to assess our options on where to go next (ie: to migrate to a new, more economic platform, or to optimise our current site in some way so as to drastically bring the bandwidth down).

    Thanks in advance for any help,
    Dan

  • #2
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    The real problem here, is it seems your paying a lot for bandwidth. Bandwidth is cheap and almost non-cost existent, even though your residential ISPs have limits. The funny thing is, the lower end facilities are generally the ones who charge high like this. I think it's time to just switch hosts. Unless, you're paying for a "managed host", which really isn't all what you think.

    Your monthly bandwidth is not relative to other businesses your size, it's personalized to the size of your site and the uniqueness. There are a lot of factors, like amount of media, number of pages, number of converting visitors, caching, and crawlers. I would get in touch with a good third party developer, to go through and make sure your browser caching and page size is optimal. If you still want to go the route of trying to save bandwidth.

    As I said, the easiest thing would find a host that best fits your needs. I ran a pretty large site at one time, at HostMonster, and when I went to 150GB one month, I didn't pay a dime more. Although, I did have problems with CPU throttling. You might want to check out http://www.blahertech.com/landing.php though.

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    DanC (05-15-2013)

  • #3
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    That does seem a lot of bandwidth, yes.

    I'm running an eCommerce site, and two other websites, total pageviews about 51,000 on a single hosting account and the total bandwidth last month was just under 18Gb.

    Looking at your pages, I can't see the un-resized images to which you refer - those on e.g Audio Converters are sized at 140px square. Ah sorry, you said these had been resized subsequently. Another consideration can be javascript, but you're using a CDN for jQuery etc. So from a quick glance there's nothing obvious eating your bandwidth.

    If you have access to cPanel you should be able to get a breakdown of how your bandwidth is used (e.g by type of file), which may suggest areas for consideration.
    Use the W3C HTML Validator and CSS Validator to check your code and Firebug to see what css is applied to an element
    Read Steve Krug's book Don't Make Me Think - essential reading on web usability
    I don't recommend much, but I do recommend Clook for UK web hosting

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    DanC (05-15-2013)

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanC View Post
    We are only a small company (5 staff), and get around 50-60,000 page views per month. Please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but surely there is something uneconomic in either the website's coding/structure or the way we have it set out, that is making us use so much bandwidth each month?!
    Have you done the math? Your home page is 916kb. Multiply that by 60K views and you get 55GB. That of course is assuming these views aren't cached, and also assuming your views are on that home page only (I presume other pages might have even more content). So yes, exceeding 100GB seems quite doable.

    One thing I noticed is many javascript file loads. You might make sure they're all necessary, and if possible combine some or all into a single file. I didn't notice much of anything else other than just "the page has a lot of stuff on it".

    Dave

    By the way, your chat routine does send session info back and forth to the server about every 8-10 seconds. It's only 57 bytes, but I just noticed since I hadn't closed the window to your site, I created a few hundred bytes of traffic. I don't know how long that would take to add up to 100GB though
    Last edited by tracknut; 05-14-2013 at 03:53 PM.

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    DanC (05-15-2013)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blaher View Post
    Your monthly bandwidth is not relative to other businesses your size, it's personalized to the size of your site and the uniqueness. There are a lot of factors, like amount of media, number of pages, number of converting visitors, caching, and crawlers. I would get in touch with a good third party developer, to go through and make sure your browser caching and page size is optimal. If you still want to go the route of trying to save bandwidth.
    Thanks for the advice, that's a great idea about consulting a third party developer to take a look at it to make sure it's optimised as much as poss.

    Quote Originally Posted by SB65 View Post
    That does seem a lot of bandwidth, yes.

    I'm running an eCommerce site, and two other websites, total pageviews about 51,000 on a single hosting account and the total bandwidth last month was just under 18Gb.

    Looking at your pages, I can't see the un-resized images to which you refer - those on e.g Audio Converters are sized at 140px square. Ah sorry, you said these had been resized subsequently. Another consideration can be javascript, but you're using a CDN for jQuery etc. So from a quick glance there's nothing obvious eating your bandwidth.

    If you have access to cPanel you should be able to get a breakdown of how your bandwidth is used (e.g by type of file), which may suggest areas for consideration.
    Thans for this mate. Unfortunately, as it's a private platform, we don't have any access to the cPanel or the server (aside from FTP access a few levels down from the root folder), and the platform providers aren't too transparent.

    I'm hopeful that now they've put the "thumbnailer" in place that should bring down the bandwidth quite a bit.

    When you say we're using a CDN for jQuery, do you mean that the library we use is located on Google's server? (Sorry for my lack of knowledge, it's a big learning curve for me, a front-end guy!)

    Quote Originally Posted by tracknut View Post
    I presume other pages might have even more content). So yes, exceeding 100GB seems quite doable.

    One thing I noticed is many javascript file loads. You might make sure they're all necessary, and if possible combine some or all into a single file. I didn't notice much of anything else other than just "the page has a lot of stuff on it".
    Dave
    By the way, your chat routine does send session info back and forth to the server about every 8-10 seconds. It's only 57 bytes, but I just noticed since I hadn't closed the window to your site, I created a few hundred bytes of traffic. I don't know how long that would take to add up to 100GB though
    Thanks for a heads up on this one with the chat session. We're looking to change our live chat system soon (that one is free and VERY buggy) so hopefully this'll help.

    I have also signed up and set-up Cloudflare (CDN) - Do you expect this will have much of an impact on our bandwidth?

  • #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanC View Post
    Thans for this mate. Unfortunately, as it's a private platform, we don't have any access to the cPanel or the server (aside from FTP access a few levels down from the root folder), and the platform providers aren't too transparent.
    OK. However if your providers are telling you you've bust the bandwidth limit it's not unreasonable to ask for some details.

    I'm hopeful that now they've put the "thumbnailer" in place that should bring down the bandwidth quite a bit.
    Sounds like that's going to make the biggest difference - if this wasn't done before the start of the current month that may be why you're going to exceed the quota this month I guess.

    When you say we're using a CDN for jQuery, do you mean that the library we use is located on Google's server? (Sorry for my lack of knowledge, it's a big learning curve for me, a front-end guy!)
    Yes, CDN = Content Delivery Network. If you're hosting your own copy of (say) jQuery then that can eat a lot of bandwidth if your site is busy. If it's on Google then obviously it's not contributing to your bandwidth usage.
    Use the W3C HTML Validator and CSS Validator to check your code and Firebug to see what css is applied to an element
    Read Steve Krug's book Don't Make Me Think - essential reading on web usability
    I don't recommend much, but I do recommend Clook for UK web hosting


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