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  1. #1
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    Discussion on best technologies for Web Development?

    Hi all

    I hope this is the right section to post this question, I couldn't see a better suited one.

    I am looking at creating a website that an user can login to, upload pics, do searches etc - something similar to facebook but for golf. I would like you experts to advise me on the best technologies to learn and develop the website with.

    About eight years ago I held positions developing VB6 and ASP.NET/C# but came out of that area so I've lost that knowledge (use it or lose it). Times move on quickly with technologies so I need directing on what to use. One point I would like to make is that in the past I bought books on individual subjects (i.e. one book for HTML, one for JavaScript etc..) and then I tried to knit the technologies together but this time I would like a good book recommened that will teach me all the technologies and how that fit in together, a book I can work through chapter by chapter.

    So my advice needed/questions answered are:
    1) I anticipate using Open Source technologies so I don't need any licenses for producing, or letting the world use, my website, for this reason I'm dismissing .NET or JAVA technologies (plus the hosting charges are cheaper for Open Source) -- would you guys agree this is best?

    2) I'm learning towards LAMP - is this still the best approach for developing a website? Would any of you advise going for WAMP (again the Windows hosting costs) as I'm wondering if there are main benefits for wamp?

    3) With LAMP what:
    a) versions of 'L' Linux should I use?
    b) verisions of 'A' Apache should I use?
    c) should I use MySQL or PostgreSQL (I'm looking for a robust free to use Database with architecture close to SQL Server)?
    d) should I use Perl, Python or PHP - I'm looking to use a language that is the future (i.e. maybe PHP was best five years ago but now, say, Perl has been bought by a big company it is the future - this is just a for instance)?
    e) for the 'P' is there a language that is more robust, maybe more OO than others for correctness?

    Of course I will need XHTML, CSS and Javascript but those technologies are the same and still the ones to use as they were five years ago.

    I just need some guidance on whats the best (future proof) technologies to use as if I'm going to learn something then I may as well learn something that is regarded highly and that will be around for years.

    Thank you in advance.

  • #2
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    Would any of you advise going for WAMP (again the Windows hosting costs)
    To clarify, WAMP (and XAMPP, LAMP.. even AMP!) have little to do with the hosting service. They are free packages that you can install to quickly get up and running with server-side coding. They enable you to build and test sites locally. [Added: Well, this may not be entirely true: if your host uses an Apache server then there may be benefits to developing in this environment.]

    I use WAMP, which is targeted for Windows, but have previously used XAMPP. They are pretty much the same. They install an Apache server, PHP and MySql, and a bunch of other nonsense! I recall that XAMPP included Perl libraries.

    I cannot suggest which SS-language is preferable, or future-proof. I use PHP mainly because it was so easy to get started, via XAMPP and a good book: "PHP and MySql something" by Larry Ullman. If you go this route then recent PHP versions are more fully OO, and use PDO rather than the MySql libraries: PDO is more up-to-date OO-technology that can work with any database system. [I'm sure others might recommend ColdFusion, Python, etc..]

    CSS, HTML and JS have changed quite a lot in recent years (CSS3, HTML5), although previous knowledge will still be relevant. I like "HTML & CSS design and build websites" by Jon Duckett. But I would have to recommend a separate book for JavaScript: "JavaScript, The Definitive Guide", David Flanagan - although, not a light read..

    If I knew which language was future-proof.. I probably wouldn't tell you

    BTW Most hosts provide PHP and MySql (and Perl, and..) but I've noticed that free (or cheaper) hosts don't tend to include Python; but this is only based on my limited experience.
    BTWW XHTML is dead in the water. It is Ex-HTML (he, he!!)
    Last edited by AndrewGSW; 12-23-2012 at 10:02 PM.
    "I'm here to save your life. But if I'm going to do that, I'll need total uninanonynymity." Me Myself & Irene.
    Validate your HTML and CSS

  • #3
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    Learning PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, and CSS: A Step by Step.. by Robin Nixon seems to have good reviews at Amazon, but I haven't read it myself.
    But you should start with HTML
    "I'm here to save your life. But if I'm going to do that, I'll need total uninanonynymity." Me Myself & Irene.
    Validate your HTML and CSS

  • #4
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    AndrewGSW,
    Thank you for your time replying, the info is much appreciated.
    I think what I'm looking for in reply is guidance on the technologies that will be okay to do and ones that I should steer clear of - your answers have helped me.
    I mentioned LAMP as there seems to be alot of books that knit those technologies together. I will need help re-learning it all again so I think I will buy a LAMP book and go from there - yes that will mean LINUX (as I understand AMP works better with LINUX than WINDOWS), APACHE, MySQL (not PostgreSQL) and PHP. You haven't suggested anything to tell me not to use those technologies. My only fear was to invest all that time and effort only to find what I've used wasn't the best choice/decision.
    I wasn't aware XHTML is dead (I was always puzzled why people would use XHTML over HTML), and that book you suggested I actually had the first edition that I bought in anticipation of cracking on with this in the first place but never got round to it. Hopefully the second edition will be up to date with all current technologies.
    Thanks.

  • #5
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    I've hosted sites on Unix and Windows servers over the years, and see them as pretty much interchangeable. I wouldn't go to any extraordinary efforts to avoid Windows.

    Dave


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