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  1. #1
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    Quoting prices for web design...

    A buddy of mine and i have begun building personal and business web sites for people through word of mouth. Our capabilities include being able to create our websites with professional appeal. Though we have very little of our own content. We are starting from the ground up. Of course using up to date software along with our average coding abilities, which include html, css, visual basic, sql, and flash.

    Our question...

    We need to find out how to price our services. For example, what should we charge a client who wants a site with basic html and css coding for say 10 pages; in addition, we would be doing minor graphical editing work on client supplied content? Or a site with flash content, as well as datebase implementation.
    Should i charge by the hour?...by the project?....by block time?...by page? Get it?

    We are completely in the dark about this. Also wondering how much location comes into play, being that we are living in new york metro area.

    Any help on the matter would be greatly appreciate....so we can start making some money with this.

    Thanks very much....

    ddubs & lost

  • #2
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    Arrow

    Well it's a tricky thing to decided because it depends on a few factors. I personally like to get a feel for the project and see/estimate how much time I'm going to spend and then give a price based on that while considering their budget. I always ask how much of a budget they have to spend because that way I can adjust to that. If you wanted say for example 10 dollars but they only had 5 to spend than you might lose them to somebody else, where as if you asked them first how much of a budget they had and they said 5 dollars you could adjust to that and come up with something that satisfies both you and them. Obviously you wouldn't spend as much time with the project for 5 dollars as you would for one paying 10. That way you still get paid.
    To sum it up, the more they spend, the more time and effort I put into it. Not saying I'd do a bad job for a cheap project, I just wouldn't make the layout as complex.

    As for actual pricing I'm not sure. It's really up to you and what you feel you should be getting. A 10 page site with a style sheet? I dunno, it depends on the quality of your work but I'd say a few 100 bucks.

    Hope this helps some as it's not an easy thing to figure out.
    whittys.com
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  • #3
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    Check out this old post for the same question...

    Help on Money issues for webdesigners
    -WebMark Art
    Programming is 80% thinking and 20% spelling

  • #4
    Senior Coder Mhtml's Avatar
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    That was a good thread, it got sort of off track towards the end but it was a good insight.
    Omnis mico antequam dominus Spookster!

  • #5
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    mhtml...yes good thread.

    Thanks for posting that webmarket.

  • #6
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    I have a buddy who is an international master-level chess player. For pocket change he tutors other chess enthusiasts. When he first started out, he charged $20 an hour and never ran short of students. A chess grandmaster once told him that people suspect cheap prices and that he should charge more. Okay, he agreed, and starting charging $100 an hour. Lo and behold, the results stunned him. Not only does he have just as many students as before, they are of a better financial class. He even gets invited to gatherings and such, further expanding his client database.

    The moral of the story is: ask for the moon, but be willing to settle for a piece of New York. Give them room to negotiate - businessmen especially love that part. It's like asking for a raise; ask for a lot and you'll most likely get more than you originally wanted.

  • #7
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    I agree with you eggman, people like to negotiate and think they are getting a deal. I usually give them a little higher of an estimate with the realization that I will do it for less.
    -WebMark Art
    Programming is 80% thinking and 20% spelling

  • #8
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    Yeah I'll concur with that; to a big extent, the price you charge creates a perception of value, which can bring you higher value customers, even if the product is the same

    Companies expect you to screw them.
    Last edited by brothercake; 03-24-2003 at 04:13 PM.
    "Why bother with accessibility? ... Because deep down you know that the web is attractive to people who aren't exactly like you." - Joe Clark

  • #9
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    "Programming is 80% thinking and 20% spelling."

    lol

    A great percentage of errors are caused by typos; a growing percentage of blindness is caused by looking for them...

  • #10
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    Design Pricing & Quotes

    Two good books:
    The Business Side of Creativity
    Graphic Artists Guild Handbook

    Even though these books are more focused on graphic designers, they offer alot of good advice and resources, including pricing guidelines and sample contracts.

    About my pricing: well I agree that it depends on the job. I try to get a feel for my clients needs and budget before quoting a job.

    As a general rule, I'm not interested in any job under $1,000. When you cosider the time that goes into site development, non-billable admin time, and non-billable sales time $1,000 really isn't very much.

    My aim is to secure jobs that range between $2,000 and $10,000. I offer dhtml,html, copy writing, photo editing, site architecure, logo development, AND 1 year of site maintenance (1 hour per month max).

    It seems like some of you charge so little. I'm not sure how you can make a living charging only $500 a site. Can you share links to sites that you've done along with a rough idea of what you charged. I just want to make sure that I'm not over charging.

    Best Regards,
    MaFunk


    mdcreative.com


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