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  1. #1
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    Hidden IE Protocol!

    Hidden Protocol!
    While browsing some folders (in Windows 98), I found a file at c:\windows\web\wallpaper that was indended as a desktop background. It used the res: protocol in the src attribute of an IMG tag. And the src file was a dll (many Windows icons are stored in single dll files too). So apparently it is possible to have several images in several different formats crammed into one file. Download the file at http://XFox_Prower.tripod.com/goodies/membg.zip .
    You have to paste the address into the address bar due to tripod linking junk. Unzip into some folder, and then make an HTML
    page in that folder with the following lines:

    <IMG src="res://membg.dll/credit.gif">
    <IMG src="res://membg.dll/logo.gif">
    <IMG src="res://membg.dll/membg.gif">

    That's 3 images in 1 file. In a hex editor, you can't search for these file names. They are spelled out in the file with a gap in between each letter. L i k e t h i s (exe files with the 'version tab' in the properties have a similar storing). Xtree Gold 3.01 can do searches in a format like .*g*i*f with a range of 80 characters between each * which is very helpful.

    So what I want to know is whether this can be used online. And also, how can I create my own dll library of images? This can save time when it comes to downloading files (smaller cluster size and having to download less files at once). A similar idea
    is how Winamp skins use BMP files and each image is at a different offset in the image (somewhat friendly to the user while not having to load up several files at once).

    My homepage http://XFox_Prower.tripod.com has 8 special images; 1 around each link. Each of these images have a size range of 104 bytes to 115 bytes each (small!). I couldn't possibly make these much smaller, yet it seems to take so long to load all
    the images on the page. It's not because the size of each file, but the fact that they are all trying to load at the same time. If I could combine each of these files and use them online, I'd have a page that loads 2x as fast. And all the 8 images added together would equal less than 1 kb. I'm hoping the indexing info saved in the dll file doesn't add up to too much, but it would still be beneficial I think. Has anyone come across this? I need some help researching it. But I bet only IE supports this protocol. But we all have to make the choice between IE and NS. It wouldn't be the only thing that NS users couldn't view and they still have IE anyway.

  • #2
    jkd
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    Re: Hidden IE Protocol!

    Originally posted by Tails
    But I bet only IE supports this protocol. But we all have to make the choice between IE and NS. It wouldn't be the only thing that NS users couldn't view and they still have IE anyway.
    Do things correctly, with workarounds for IE, and you never need to choose. Mozilla has a res:// and a chrome:// protocol, but they point to different directors than the IE res:// protocol. They are not for webpages to use.

  • #3
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    I know doing it online goes beyond their intention, but there's no way to use this online at all? Not even something serverside? I'm still interested in how these dll files can be created.

  • #4
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    Regarding the dll, Microsoft programs can contain embbed icons and images, you don't have to store them in a separate .ico file.

    Microsoft's Visual Studio software comes with an icon editor so you can create icons for your programs. These can be stored in .ico files or included in the compiled .exe or .dll.

    In fact, you can create several icons for a given .dll, .exe or .ico including icons of different sizes and color depth. You may notice that if you change the view option in Windows Explorer the icons for some files actually change, they don't just get resized.

    I'm guessing "res" stands for resource file. .res is the file extension that Visual Studio uses to store information for any forms and dialogs you create when building a Windows application as well as embedded images and icons.

  • #5
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    In a hex editor, you can't search for these file names. They are spelled out in the file with a gap in between each letter. L i k e t h i s (exe files with the 'version tab' in the properties have a similar storing).
    Think Unicode, those strings are stored in Unicode which is a two bytes per letter coding system which also happens to line up with ASCII in the first 255 characters.


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