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Former standards consultant to Microsoft for Internet Explorer, Molly, is now working for Opera!
Commenting on her time at Microsoft their announced IE8 "blacklisting" of web sites:
People who know me and know the history of how the IE8 opt-in opt-out switch got all, well, switched around will see immediately the irony of today’s events. I really, really want to maintain the belief that when Microsoft made that impressive and unprecedented leap into shipping standards mode as default, that that meant something. That was the result of a lot of hard work, a lot of pain, a lot of fury, and at least one person (me) who is now sitting here wondering if anything I spent the last year and a half of my life doing was helpful.
Molly and I had some back and forth (using my real name) when she went to work at Microsoft. Essentially I accused her
of "selling out" but changed my mind after reading her comments of what was really going on at MS after she left there.
It's good to see she's now with a reputable company that promotes what is good about the internet and good for us
developers.
About Microsoft's announcement the other day:
This means that if you want IE8 readiness, you have to get ready now, or you run the risk of having your sites be on this blacklist, forcing IE7 rendering even if you authored the sites using open standards.
About going to Opera:
What is astonishing to me is that for the first time in my career, I am with a company that specifically empowers its employees in regards to open standards.
This is quite the change of pace, for as many readers are aware, through my former roles as a group lead for the Web Standards Project (WaSP) and then as a standards consultant to Microsoft, standards evangelism has been an uphill battle with no rest for the weary, no aid for the wounded.