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  1. #1
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    What Computer Programming Language is the easiest to start with

    Hello... I'm currently 15 years old and I finally decided to learn programming languages but I don't know which language to start. I wish to become a game designer or game programmer also. Any suggestions on what language I should start with? Thank you for all those who will reply.

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    Don't want to break your dream, but many of us got interested by computers by games and most wanted to do become game programmer, but very few are actually game programmers now.

    If you are a good programmer, if you start learning early and be serious, everything is possible!

    Game programming is quite vast and some areas of it are almost mathematics only (like game physics).

    If you want to start and don't have any programming experience, I would recommend to start with a "lighter", easier to read, language like Delphi. OK Delphi is not the #1 programming language some argue, but it's easier to "read" for a begginer than C++ or c#.

    Also once you will have learned from a book or two the programming basics (variables, pointers, loops, conditions, etc) do some game maps with the (often) bundled game map editor. Some are pretty simple to use yet powerful (like the Warcraft III map editor).

    Doing personnal project is a great way to learn programming!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWolf1 View Post
    If you want to start and don't have any programming experience, I would recommend to start with a "lighter", easier to read, language like Delphi. OK Delphi is not the #1 programming language some argue, but it's easier to "read" for a begginer than C++ or c#.
    Delphi is not a programming language, is an IDE build over pascal and a specific set of libraries.
    But, ..., I agree that pascal is a better start point then c/c++,

    best regards

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    alechris (05-17-2009)

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWolf1 View Post
    Don't want to break your dream, but many of us got interested by computers by games and most wanted to do become game programmer, but very few are actually game programmers now.

    If you are a good programmer, if you start learning early and be serious, everything is possible!

    Game programming is quite vast and some areas of it are almost mathematics only (like game physics).

    If you want to start and don't have any programming experience, I would recommend to start with a "lighter", easier to read, language like Delphi. OK Delphi is not the #1 programming language some argue, but it's easier to "read" for a begginer than C++ or c#.

    Also once you will have learned from a book or two the programming basics (variables, pointers, loops, conditions, etc) do some game maps with the (often) bundled game map editor. Some are pretty simple to use yet powerful (like the Warcraft III map editor).

    Doing personnal project is a great way to learn programming!
    Thanks I'll follow your advice and start being serious about learning languages. Is Delphi easier to read for a beginner than the C language(Not the C++ or C# just regular C).

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    Quote Originally Posted by alechris View Post
    Thanks I'll follow your advice and start being serious about learning languages. Is Delphi easier to read for a beginner than the C language(Not the C++ or C# just regular C).
    learning delphi means learning pascal + delphi library and ide.
    yes, I think that pascal is more "human" then c(but I still prefere c/c++),
    you can see yourself and make a opinion:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pascal_...ming_language)

    main avantage of pascal is that help you to learn programming and after a while you can learn easy other procedural/imperative languages.
    Learning syntax of a language is not a difficult task,

    best regards

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    Quote Originally Posted by oesxyl View Post
    learning delphi means learning pascal + delphi library and ide.
    yes, I think that pascal is more "human" then c(but I still prefere c/c++),
    you can see yourself and make a opinion:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pascal_...ming_language)

    main avantage of pascal is that help you to learn programming and after a while you can learn easy other procedural/imperative languages.
    Learning syntax of a language is not a difficult task,

    best regards

    I see I took a look at the site you gave me and I also agree that Delphi/Pascal is more easier to read than C. Then again C is also used more often than Delphi. I guess I'll start learning with Delphi/Pascal first so that I'll eventually get used to using and learning programming languages thank you for the valuable info. Are there still books on learning Delphi/Pascal? Because nowadays there are only online tutorials.
    Last edited by alechris; 05-17-2009 at 12:58 PM.

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    I can't stand Delphi and do not find it particularly easy or pretty. I would always use C/C++ in place of Delphi.

    I have talked to a lot of CS students about this and the vast majority find Python to be the best language to start with. You can write games with it using PyOpenGL (3d) or pygame (2d).


    However, there is a disadvantage to starting with an easy language. You tend not to ever want to move away from it, even if you need to. Most of those students that said they liked to learn Python first, found leaning Java later relatively difficult. Students who learned Java first and then Python later often picked up python in a matter of hours.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWolf1 View Post
    Don't want to break your dream, but many of us got interested by computers by games and most wanted to do become game programmer, but very few are actually game programmers now.

    If you are a good programmer, if you start learning early and be serious, everything is possible!

    Game programming is quite vast and some areas of it are almost mathematics only (like game physics).
    Agreed.

    You're going to do yourself a favor by realizing that math and basic games theory is going to be dry material. In the beginning, you're not going to be creating the next geewhizbang FPS or some amazing 3D game, you're going to be starting with probably something less exciting than the original Pong (link for the 15 y.o. and anyone else that doesn't remember this - I actually played it back in the 70's, yes I'm old).

    I tell you this in the same vein as TheWolf1; don't get frustrated, just keep at it.

    I also don't see why you couldn't learn using one of the Visual Studio Express editions - they're free and I believe they also have a gaming plugin.

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    Beginner game programming is as fun as you want to make it. The key is just to remember that a lot of games are very fun and often the most fun and addictive games are very simple. Desktop Tower Defence is a great example of this that got millions of people addicted very quickly.

    Trying to start off with a 3D FPS, you will not end up with something very good. A lot of people don't even start there, they try to get something like a quake engine and convince themselves that they are learning how to make games.

    Starting off with something like asteroids and building on that as you go to add cool explosion effects, powerups, multiplayer, bosses etc makes for a very fun game. One of the first games I made was a 2D top down space shooter that gets progressively harder the longer you stay alive and it's still my favourite.
    Last edited by ghell; 05-18-2009 at 07:00 PM.

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    how things have changed in my day, we started off with gwbasic and later qbasic as a beginner program lol

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    When i started programming i was 7 years old and was using Basic on the ZX spectrum. Then i was using a Amstrad and basic. Then some years later my dad got me an Atari and I was using STOS the game creator, which was very similar to the BASIC i had been using. That was what i made my first proper game on. Then at school we had Acorns and guess what I used basic. At college they got me on PC's and we were using pascal. Then on to university and C++ and Java, Python among others. All of which put me off becoming a programmer. So i started to go down the Hardware/Administration path after university. Then some years later I really badly wanted to join a Half Life 2 clan. I wasn't good enough to join, but they didn't have a web site. I couldn't really design websites but told the clan leader I could and that if I could join his clan I would build him a website. He agreed. I spent days on Front Page, Dreamweaver and some rubbishy Microsoft package (can't remember the name of) getting really frustrated. About a month later the clan leader asked me to see what i had done. But i only had an embarrassment to show. So i told my m8 about my dilemma. Luckily he was hosting and agreed to set me up a CMS website. He installed it for me and gave me admin rights. Two days later I had built my first site with everything a gaming clan could of ever wanted. It started out just editing little bits of HTML within the CMS pages. I was getting hooked. I decided to look at the PHP. It was vastly complicated because the CMS was advanced, but some of my past life was coming flooding back to me. My next gaming clan I decided I would build a site from scratch. Took about 6 months but eventually with the help of forums and Internet I built it and I was fast learning HTML, CSS and PHP. Though it was very insecure and inefficient I showed my boss at the time what i had achieved and she was so impressed she let me rebuild there website for them. I did it all in PHP. I had fallen in love with PHP. Then she found some clients who wanted me to build a site. And that was the start of my career in web development, about the time I joined codingforums. Got a decent Job as a PHP developer now. Sorry for sharing my life story but the point I'm trying to get at is they don't really have easy to learn programming languages like they used to. The Basics of the past are long gone. Try learning Visual Basic for instance. It's not easy at all. Well out of all the programming languages I have learned in my life the one that I have learned the quickest was PHP and overall has been the one I love the most. I think it's really easy for a beginner, but it's not for an application developer, it's for websites... Good luck on your search hope you find the right one for you.
    Last edited by timgolding; 05-19-2009 at 01:53 AM.
    You can not say you know how to do something, until you can teach it to someone else.

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    Wow thank you for giving me helpful advices and suggestions. It's really helping me a lot Now I've got a lot of programming languages to consider to learn. Thank you for giving me ideas on where to start with at least I'm not as confused as I was before. It's also true that learning easier languages can have disadvantages but it also depends on the person if he/she wants to grow out of it and learn harder languages but thank you for making me realize that I really need to work hard I'm currently learning Turbo Pascal because I couldn't find some books on Delphi on our local bookstore.
    Last edited by alechris; 05-19-2009 at 12:25 PM.

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    If you want to learn Python at any point, you can do it without books. They have a fantastic tutorial in their documentation:

    http://docs.python.org/tutorial/
    The first few pages are just setup of Python though, as it is just a 1 click install and is run by clicking python.exe or typing "python" or creating a .py file (and just double clicking it to run your program on Windows), you can probably skip all that.

    No compiling necessary and you can do it in any text editor such as notepad. Just save and double click the .py file to run when you're done
    For example, after installing Python, open up notepad and put
    print("Hello, World!")
    in it, then save it as hello.py (make sure to save it as .py not .py.txt) and then double click on it.
    Last edited by ghell; 05-19-2009 at 01:45 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ghell View Post
    If you want to learn Python at any point, you can do it without books. They have a fantastic tutorial in their documentation:

    http://docs.python.org/tutorial/
    The first few pages are just setup of Python though, as it is just a 1 click install and is run by clicking python.exe or typing "python" or creating a .py file (and just double clicking it to run your program on Windows), you can probably skip all that.

    No compiling necessary and you can do it in any text editor such as notepad. Just save and double click the .py file to run when you're done
    For example, after installing Python, open up notepad and put
    print("Hello, World!")
    in it, then save it as hello.py (make sure to save it as .py not .py.txt) and then double click on it.
    Alright Thank you for the helpful info I'll give it a try once I'm done learning Turbo

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    BTW theres free Delphi compilers since 2006.

    Go to:
    http://downloads.embarcadero.com/free/turbo
    then
    Delphi Downloads
    then download
    Turbo Delphi 2006 Explorer

    you have the free C++ "flavor" here too (but can only install one at a time on the same PC).

    Delphi is a programming language based on Pascal. It's not just Pascal it's more than that. But I agree the Delphi "scene" is by far less popular than C++ or .NET or many others but I still think it's one of the best platform to learn Object Oriented programming. Many programmers don't "like" Delphi mostly because it's different syntax and logic (compared to C/C++). Delphi was one of my first IDE that I've learned 10 years ago and I haven't seen something that C++ could do that Delphi coudlnt. Yes starting with C++ (or one of it's "friend") will lead you straighter to your goal, but I think the first point for you now is to understang the logics and basics of programming, and I think the C++ syntax will be an unnessacery obstacle for you now. I aggree than once you've mastered the basics of OO programming, move out to a more popular language like C++ or C#...

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