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Thread: Learning C

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    Learning C

    I just got a SAMS Teach yourself C in 24 hrs. Now not knowing anything about the C++ pr C computer Programming... My ideal thing i want to do is make a sports computer Simulation game and i was just wondering with this book how long would it take to make a sports simulation game after i read this book?

    I also got Borland C++ 5.02 Starter kit

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    Senior Coder tomws's Avatar
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    A long time.

    Think of it this way: after you learn to ride a bike, how long will it take before you can compete in the Tour de France? There's a difference between the skill required to ride a bike and the skill required to compete in a race, even though the fundamentals are the same.

    Likewise, after you've read a book and written a few "Hello, World!" apps, you may possess the fundamental skills of programming, but there's still work and practice to go before you're skilled and effective enough to develop something like a sim.

    By the way, that's not an attempt to elevate software development ("programming") to an elitist level, or to suggest that you can't do it. It's just an honest appraisal. Software is difficult. But it's not impossible.

    If the book is a good one, it will have some increasingly difficult exercises as you progress. After you're done with it, find a need somewhere and write some software to solve it. Or try to reproduce some existing applications with your own code, starting simple and building in difficulty. And don't rush - it's better to delay and actually understand what you're doing rather than just to slop out some code that matches an exercise. You'll be a better developer and, likely, a happier developer.

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    It may take a year or two to gain the expertise to do it, but idk. I would recommend trying to program simpler games first, such as Tetris or Pong.
    Trinithis

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    Well programming doesn't work like 'that'. After reading a book you won't just click and go "Aah now i know C!". What the book probably doesn't teach you is how to make things like that. If you fully understand C then go ahead! But for now, just focus on learning. Please don't just be impatient. First learn C and keep practising, when you feel comfortable making smaller programs from knowledge, then move onto your sports simulator. Good luck

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinithis View Post
    It may take a year or two to gain the expertise to do it, but idk. I would recommend trying to program simpler games first, such as Tetris or Pong.
    Actually tetris is a good programming project/problem. It requires a fair bit of work and involves lots of good topics that are used in all programs.
    OracleGuy

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    If all you want to do is make a game, why not start out with one of those game creation softwares. They generally use some easier-than-C language.

    Although learning C will certainly stand you in good stead!
    Daniel
    XZIST.org

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    Regular Coder mjlorbet's Avatar
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    yeah.... C at that.... C++, C# (if you're going for windows), gtk, VB, anything will make the process easier. if you're hoping to do much of anything with graphics (and especially on windows, and extremely especially on vista) you'll have to move to a language in the CLR so you can work with the apis instead of trying to re-invent the wheel completely. that said, i fully support people learning C and ASM just to get the low level understanding of what's actually going on "under the hood" in modern applications, but that's by no means to say to learn them to create modern applications. go with high level & rely on the CLR, that's what most all of us have been reduced to, but it seems to be the way things are moving.
    -Mike
    "Want me to precludify him, like some kind of dispatcherator?... Can do!" -Bender

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    Quote Originally Posted by mjlorbet View Post
    yeah.... C at that.... C++, C# (if you're going for windows), gtk, VB, anything will make the process easier. if you're hoping to do much of anything with graphics (and especially on windows, and extremely especially on vista) you'll have to move to a language in the CLR so you can work with the apis instead of trying to re-invent the wheel completely. that said, i fully support people learning C and ASM just to get the low level understanding of what's actually going on "under the hood" in modern applications, but that's by no means to say to learn them to create modern applications. go with high level & rely on the CLR, that's what most all of us have been reduced to, but it seems to be the way things are moving.
    All those APIs are easily accessible in C. In fact the Win32 API is all C functions not C++.
    OracleGuy


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