Hello and welcome to our community! Is this your first visit?
Register
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    70
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Computer Science, TOO NARROW?

    So I have been wondering lately if computer science is a career field that has a very narrow of opportunities being offered to a computer science major. But if a person was to have a degree in business and something in IT then wouldn't that person be more apt to find a job pretty quickly after college? I would say that computer science seems like all you are is stuck on selecting from a few job titles, where as an MIS major may have alot more opportunities.

    what would you guys say about that is there any truth in this statement?

  • #2
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    45
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Not sure what you mean to be honest. Might be a good idea to link to the actual courses where people could see whats involved. "Computer science too narrow" is a huge generalization.

  • #3
    New to the CF scene
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I dont think so. Computer science always has a say. I know many people graduated in mechanics and electronics working in computer niche, as it is one of the highest paying...

  • #4
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I am not agree with your view that computer science is get narrow for career.Yes this is true technologies have been change day by day so that you can update your self. And it give good career and good pay.

  • #5
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    The best paid people are experts in a particular field. While they generally appeal to a smaller crowd, they can then charge more for their expertise. While computer science itself may limit you, being a consultant can be quit profitable and freeing. My recommendation is to hone the degree's teachings and continue education in the field. As previously stated, the courses involved really does matter, but what is most important is your knowledge and expertise in the area.

  • #6
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    17
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Qualifications are worthless compared to real work experience.
    So if you want to take control of your career, start a personal project and build your skill set around that while getting whatever essential qualifications you need to support that.

    A general catch-all IT qualification is okay, but something more specific to what you want to pursue is better.

  • #7
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    10
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    There are many opportunities. Also keep in mind that many people in all college majors end up working in fields that they did not major in while in college.

    If you have a passion for computers then study computers and you will do well. If you're doing it just for the money or because the opportunities are there... it could turn into more of a grind while all you think about is what you'd really like to be doing.

  • #8
    Regular Coder
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    168
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
    Business is a fairly broad degree area to compare with Computer Science. That would be the equivalent of grouping all science degrees together (biology, chemistry, etc.). IT is definitely a good career route and ultimately more of what I want to do in the long run. I am currently going for my B.S. in Computer Science because I think the concepts you learn are vital to many IT fields where honestly, they don't teach these basic principles. I plan to get my masters in IT but believe my CSCI background will gain me respect. Let's be honest, anyone can get a business degree. The job market for CS & IT is rapidly growing, where did you get the idea that it is easier with a business degree - that's the opposite of what I hear?


  •  

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •