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  1. #1
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    programming jobs while learning

    I have a couple of questions relating to a programming career.

    Are there available jobs to acquire in the programming field while learning?

    Are there any work from home programming jobs? Then this would relate back to the 'while learning it' question.


    To get a solid career in coding is a degree in it required, certifications, etc.


    I wanted to ask you guys who actually do it opposed to a random Google search.

  • #2
    Supreme Master coder! Old Pedant's Avatar
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    Well, I'm making decent (but not great) money contracting part time. Up to 20 hours per week. But I've been programming for 45 years now and had a lot of contacts before I went into contract work. I'd probably still be doing full time work if my health would let me. Yes, you can make more money doing contracts, but the money is not as sure as the full time job. You are first to be cut when the company needs to save money.

    Yes, I think a degree is a requirement nowadays. 30 years ago, you didnt need a degree. But times change.

    There are very very few contract jobs for novices. The whole point of hiring a contractor is that you get someone who is an expert in the area where you need help so that the problems get fixed as fast as possible. Most often, the expense of a contractor is way offset by the cost of having part of the system not working properly. A novice would take too long, in most cases, even if he/she might be cheaper than the real pro.
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  • #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Pedant View Post
    Well, I'm making decent (but not great) money contracting part time. Up to 20 hours per week. But I've been programming for 45 years now and had a lot of contacts before I went into contract work. I'd probably still be doing full time work if my health would let me. Yes, you can make more money doing contracts, but the money is not as sure as the full time job. You are first to be cut when the company needs to save money.

    Yes, I think a degree is a requirement nowadays. 30 years ago, you didnt need a degree. But times change.

    There are very very few contract jobs for novices. The whole point of hiring a contractor is that you get someone who is an expert in the area where you need help so that the problems get fixed as fast as possible. Most often, the expense of a contractor is way offset by the cost of having part of the system not working properly. A novice would take too long, in most cases, even if he/she might be cheaper than the real pro.
    Well that's a bummer about needing a degree and novice work. I was in the mindset that with programmers it was more about experience and/or skillset with possibly certifications in the mix. I have three years of university under my belt, but it is for the field I am in now (Marketing/market development) which I really don't think much will transfer over. The only computer class I took was a general Microsoft office class.

    I definitely wouldn't be opposed to working full time doing this once I learn more. Though, freelance may be the route for me, as I am an entrepreneur at heart. One of the reasons I started looking into programming was because of my current job. It is a small/medium company that the owner's son does our front-end website development and our co-owner does the back-end. I see how valuable our back-end development is for our company. We contact him every day for numerous things. The front end definitely seems for hands off, but I can see this being different for other companies.

    Our owner's son (front-end developer) made a free-lance company doing front-end work and he does not have a degree and tought himself everything. He is doing very well for himself.

    So this is what got me into it some, so I was just trying to see if there are things out there I could take on to give me some experience and possibly some income along the way of learning.

  • #4
    $object->toCD-R(LP); vinyl-junkie's Avatar
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    I'm retired now but my former employer (a government job) offers in-training positions. You start out at the lowest level and when you complete designated objectives in a training plan, you get a promotion to the next level (and more money in the process). Typically, the in-training positions start you at level 1 and you advance to level 3 just by completing your training plan. It's a great deal for someone just starting their career. I don't know how many employers offer anything like that but I saw a lot of people get their career started this way.

    Another option that my former employer used, although less frequently, was internships. Those were typically two or three month assignments that gave college students some practical work experience that they could include on their resume upon graduation to help them find permanent employment.
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  • #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by vinyl-junkie View Post
    I'm retired now but my former employer (a government job) offers in-training positions. You start out at the lowest level and when you complete designated objectives in a training plan, you get a promotion to the next level (and more money in the process). Typically, the in-training positions start you at level 1 and you advance to level 3 just by completing your training plan. It's a great deal for someone just starting their career. I don't know how many employers offer anything like that but I saw a lot of people get their career started this way.

    Another option that my former employer used, although less frequently, was internships. Those were typically two or three month assignments that gave college students some practical work experience that they could include on their resume upon graduation to help them find permanent employment.
    That sounds like something I could see myself doing for now. Thanks for the insight!


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