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View Full Version : linux where to install apps



ubik
04-05-2006, 03:46 AM
Hello.

I want to start off by saying that I am new to linux, but am trying to learn..

I installed a copy of WINE on my system, I was surprised how long it took to compile.. but im down with it. lol. My question is:

I'm guessing that all of the applications for linux automatically get a shortcut reference added to the shell where i would just type the name of the app from the shell despite whatever directory im in and it will run.. So im installing windows apps on linux and I'm wondering if there is a certain directory where I have to install them into to get the shortcut in the shell, or is there another way of doing this?

any help is appreciated. sorry if what I wrote sounds noobish, truth is I am one. ;)

oh im running zenwalk 2.0.1 if it makes any difference

GJay
04-06-2006, 12:05 AM
by default, wine looks for windows apps in ~/.wine/drive_c I believe (the . means it won't show up in a standard directory listing), but you'll need to run:
wine <app.exe>

on a commandline for it to work, any aliases to the program directly will have to be set up by you

ubik
04-06-2006, 03:35 AM
I started reading up on linux, and I found that you could define paths to commands and apps to access from the shell from within your profile file. I guess i could just store all my windows apps in a custom directory and specify the path to that directory in my profile.

kitz
04-06-2006, 08:16 AM
Hello.

I want to start off by saying that I am new to linux, but am trying to learn..

I installed a copy of WINE on my system, I was surprised how long it took to compile.. but im down with it. lol. My question is:

I'm guessing that all of the applications for linux automatically get a shortcut reference added to the shell where i would just type the name of the app from the shell despite whatever directory im in and it will run.. So im installing windows apps on linux and I'm wondering if there is a certain directory where I have to install them into to get the shortcut in the shell, or is there another way of doing this?

any help is appreciated. sorry if what I wrote sounds noobish, truth is I am one. ;)

oh im running zenwalk 2.0.1 if it makes any difference

Be glad you have to compile it. That means it runs faster than a Windows equivalent would because windows programs are generalized for hardware, and Linux stuff is compiled so that it is hardwares-specific.

But to the point. From what I remember of my brother's days with WINE, be careful. It tends to crash alot, and it's obviously not that fast because your running an OS inside of an OS which inheritely invites some interesting problems. Got sidetracked again, sorry. The WINE preferred method is if you have a Windows partitioned drive or just a partition with windows on it, that you install them under windows onto that drive. It's not easy to install stuff from windows onto a linux drive/partition though -- seeing as how they're basically mortal enemies.

MAIN POINT. If possible install the program under real windows then run it in WINE. If you don't have windows then reply to this and I'll try to hook you up with my brother who knows all about WINE.

Spookster
04-06-2006, 05:45 PM
But to the point. From what I remember of my brother's days with WINE, be careful. It tends to crash alot, and it's obviously not that fast because your running an OS inside of an OS which inheritely invites some interesting problems. Got sidetracked again, sorry. The WINE preferred method is if you have a Windows partitioned drive or just a partition with windows on it, that you install them under windows onto that drive. It's not easy to install stuff from windows onto a linux drive/partition though -- seeing as how they're basically mortal enemies.

MAIN POINT. If possible install the program under real windows then run it in WINE. If you don't have windows then reply to this and I'll try to hook you up with my brother who knows all about WINE.

I'm sorry but there are so many things wrong in those statements I'm not sure where to begin.

First of all WINE has gotten much better than it was years ago. It is much more stable now. I'm not sure how you can state that compiling WINE will allow the apps that run through it to run faster than if they were running in their native environment. Maybe I misread that. If you meant that WINE will run faster on linux when compiled verses installing via RPM than if you have emulation software installed and running on windows than yeah there might be slightly better performance but it is not going to be that much of a difference. It is not preferred to have a windows partitioned drive. I assume you meant NTFS? That is not how WINE works at all. As Gjay said all apps are installed in a simulated windows directory structure and by default that is created in your home directory under ~/.wine/drive_c. You are not running and OS inside an OS. That's not what WINE does. Are you getting confused with VMWare? Installing the apps under a real windows installation and then running those apps through wine is the worst way to run things. First of all you would have to mount your NTFS drive/partition to make it visible to Linux which is fine for read only operations. Writing to NTFS from linux is not a good idea (yet) and many apps will want to write to the drive. That is why it is better to install the apps locally verses running them from an existing windows installation.

kitz
04-07-2006, 01:44 AM
I'm sorry but there are so many things wrong in those statements I'm not sure where to begin.

First of all WINE has gotten much better than it was years ago. It is much more stable now. I'm not sure how you can state that compiling WINE will allow the apps that run through it to run faster than if they were running in their native environment. Maybe I misread that. If you meant that WINE will run faster on linux when compiled verses installing via RPM than if you have emulation software installed and running on windows than yeah there might be slightly better performance but it is not going to be that much of a difference. It is not preferred to have a windows partitioned drive. I assume you meant NTFS? That is not how WINE works at all. As Gjay said all apps are installed in a simulated windows directory structure and by default that is created in your home directory under ~/.wine/drive_c. You are not running and OS inside an OS. That's not what WINE does. Are you getting confused with VMWare? Installing the apps under a real windows installation and then running those apps through wine is the worst way to run things. First of all you would have to mount your NTFS drive/partition to make it visible to Linux which is fine for read only operations. Writing to NTFS from linux is not a good idea (yet) and many apps will want to write to the drive. That is why it is better to install the apps locally verses running them from an existing windows installation.

This is why I don't deal with linux. It's simply too much for me. It may be more secure etc, but you can't play games on it and half the time I have no idea what my brother is talking about. That post of mine was best guess. And I believe that you're right, I think I was talking about VMWare. To clarify, i had meant NTFS; and I also meant that some programs you can get for linux are compiled system/hardware specific (x86 vs whatever else there is i have no idea) whereas in general all windows applications are compiled to suit the average PC. I think. I don't know why I bother trying to answer questions out of my league. I think I'll stop now lol.

Spookster
04-07-2006, 12:05 PM
Actually you can play many games on Linux using WINE and other similar emulation software. There is one company that provides a commercial version of WINE called Cedega designed specifically for running games on linux.

http://www.transgaming.com/products_linux.php



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