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View Full Version : did you make your own cms?



BroChris
08-25-2005, 10:33 PM
I've been debating with myself for quite some time on making my own cms. Am I crazy, or is this a reasonable task for an intermediate web designer with some knowledge of php?

My conflict is basically thus: I know there are plenty of good free cms's out there, but I really like not relying on the work of others if entirely possible.

So, do you use a cms, and if so, did you make it yourself? If not, which cms do you use/would recommend?

rmedek
08-25-2005, 11:03 PM
If you have the time and the budget, go ahead. But there are SO MANY options out there I find it's just easier to adapt a pre-existing one to your needs rather than start from scratch.

The majority of clients I work with want content management systems because so-and-so had one on their site, but they can only pay peanuts. So WP or TXP it is, and they usually love it. Plus I can spend less time scripting and more time tweaking design and such.

JamieR
08-26-2005, 12:37 AM
WP is good as a CMS - Drupal I heard is good. I would write my own but:

1) I don't have the patience nor the time,
2) I don't know enough php/mysql
3) If I released it, then I'm sure that not too many people would use it....(depending on amount of features)

Really it's better to use a pre existing one that can be modded if you're looking to do something special with it. Some people who can do this kinda thing only do so to get the "Look what I did" appeal...

Kurashu
08-26-2005, 01:35 AM
I'm attempting to write a multi-user CMS for the D&D website I find myself eternally working on. I won't publish it, but I'll most likely adapt it for other projects I do.

Nightfire
08-26-2005, 01:47 AM
Made a couple of basic ones for clients, but I don't bother making them if I can help it. There's plenty out there already to choose from. No point in reinventing the wheel

bazz
08-26-2005, 02:43 PM
Made a couple of basic ones for clients, but I don't bother making them if I can help it. There's plenty out there already to choose from. No point in reinventing the wheel

but aren't there different types of wheels? I had to build my own. erm no; I re-phrase... I had to get help (here) to build my own, because I couldn't be sure that those I found pre-written, would do as I need. Now I can stand over what I have and... I also have that "Look what I did" feeling that I wasn't expecting and, which weazel referred to. :)

Bazz

NancyJ
08-26-2005, 03:58 PM
When my clients need a cms for their site I build one that suits their needs. Its much quicker (in the short term) and easier to use for the client because it was designed and built for them and their site, rather than a generic solution.

AaronW
08-27-2005, 04:27 PM
I write my own whenever one is needed. They get better and easier to use with each one I make, and I've recently started working on one that's actually rather reusable while still extremely flexible. The 'look what I made' novelty has long since worn off and the focus now is knowing exactly how the site works in the event something new and unexpected needs to be added or tweaked. Completely reworking WordPress would NOT be good times.

Green Beast
08-27-2005, 05:21 PM
I made my own (with Jonathan Fenocchi's (http://www.slightlyremarkable.com) help in the latter stages), and I use it for every site I make now. It sure does save a bunch of time, plus it adds a lot of added value to my sites for the client. I actually distribute mine via GreenBeastCMS.com (http://www.greenbeastcms.com). It's free. The set-up part of it is crude, though very easy, and it's lacking in *file creation and *image management, but it is really quite smart in what it does do (added DaringFireball's SmartyPants (http://daringfireball.net/projects/smartypants/)). And it's really solid and stable. Works on PHP 4.3.x and up in a strict PHP environment. Go to the site for all the details and tour images.

*Will be v.2.0 features in addition to a number of other pro-features.

It offers a number of cool-factor tools such as a Live feed for news and updates (like WP), internal site statistics and recording for security and usage monitoring. I also has a built-in whois utility (open source package from SourceForge (http://sourceforge.net/projects/phpwhois)), and an internal free support contact form.

A plugin will be available pretty soon to add an XML/RSS news feed so users can publish RSS (v.2.0 only) with the thing as well. This part is actually about 99% complete, a working version can be viewed at GreenMethods.com Latest News (http://www.greenmethods.com/incl_pages/latest_news.php) (see XML (http://www.greenmethods.com/xml_gm/gm_news.xml)). The pagination is done, and it works pretty well, but the feed fails to load in Firefox, even though Opera is fine and Bloglines, etc. Don't know what meta data is missing but that's probably the issue. The XML is editable, but it doesn't first strip the markup making it a bit tricky for the inexperienced. It also needs to form permalinks, instead of creeping links. The only other thing to do is to dress the plug-in, do the CMS incorporation (mostly done actually), and create the (easy-to-deploy) file set for the release and download.

I recently made AdagioSpa.com (http://www.adagiospa.com/) with this tool. Minus putting blank, named and CHMOD'd files and images on the server, 100% of the build was done with the tool via my browser; mark-up, scripting, CSS. Maybe I'm too close to the thing being I made it and all and know it intimately, but I freaking love it. I have a WordPress Blog (http://www.beast-blog.com) (which isn't really a CMS but rather blogware), but my unit is so much smoother and fast in its operation -- but it doesn't have to query a DB (works with flat files only) which is likely why.

I must say, even though it is hardly best, the amount of satisfaction I get every time I use is just terrific. That feeling, combined with the experience gained from making it is priceless.

Mike

BroChris
08-31-2005, 12:46 AM
I realized after some of your comments that I actually have written a very basic cms for my clients which I customize for each client. The major downsides to the one that I wrote is that 1) clients must input html manually for any special formatting, and 2) I have to edit the cms each time to point to the pages I'd like to be editable. Maybe one day I'll have a bit of time to fix these issues.

I'd also like to create a cms that allows the user to replace images, but that may be WAY down the road.

I appreciate all of your replies/votes. Thanks.

FUN
08-31-2005, 08:30 PM
Wow, Green Beast, Nice CMS system !!! Keep up good work, i wish i could have done such flexible and flat filed CMS :thumbsup: , i can only make it with mysql... :(

Green Beast
08-31-2005, 09:40 PM
Wow, Green Beast, Nice CMS system !!! Keep up good work, i wish i could have done such flexible and flat filed CMS :thumbsup: , i can only make it with mysql... :(

Thanks for the nice comments, FUN. You're lucky, MySQL scares the hell out of me. I don't know beans about DBs except one... a 1990 DOS DB I still use today for CRM and Contact Management.

I have set up only one MySQL table in my life (and it was really easy) but I still get nervous about certain things and that's one of them.

:) Mike

gsnedders
08-31-2005, 10:11 PM
I normally don't write my own CMS, although I did write the YWDA one (only 22 hours to go! :D)

FUN
09-01-2005, 12:15 AM
Thanks for the nice comments, FUN. You're lucky, MySQL scares the hell out of me. I don't know beans about DBs except one... a 1990 DOS DB I still use today for CRM and Contact Management.

I have set up only one MySQL table in my life (and it was really easy) but I still get nervous about certain things and that's one of them.

:) Mike

:p Haha... lol... i think mySql is easier though...
flat files burn my brains. :(

BroChris
09-02-2005, 05:35 PM
I prefer flat files for a couple reasons...first just because DB's confuse me :)

Second, though, is because I never know if I'll have a client on a server without access to DB's, and he wants something that usually requires a DB.

For example, my last client wanted a simple forum, and he didn't have DB's. I found a flat file forum and was able to adjust it to his liking.

I also wrote a multi-user login system using flat files, including user profiles. Of course the content I'm protecting isn't very important, else the flat file method wouldn't be secure enough. But it works for the situation that I'm in. I'll probably never have information valuable enough to secure any more than this. But if I do, I guess I'll have to get over it and learn to use a DB...

taffd
10-16-2007, 06:09 PM
I'm just about to start building my own cms. While researching, I've come to realise that forums, cms, blogs etc are all variations on a theme. Having built a forum from scratch, I need to add a few more tables to my database and I've got them all.
I wasn't able to use an existing cms for my site, as I had over 25,000 categories and wanted news, article, poll and forum sections for each. The poll section is complete and is in effect a forum as well, so a separate forum presents no problem. A cms appears to work in much the same way. A user inputs something via a form which is stored in a database, which is then displayed on a page along with other user inputs. Selecting any one will query the DB and show the relevant info.
Database design and sql are fairly easy to get to grips with. I started with a practise DB in MS Access, using wizards. This helped me to understand how DBs were organised re relationships etc.
For sql, again not that difficult. If you can do php, you'll be able to pick up sql in a few days.

The benefit of writing your own cms, is that you'll understand the whole process and not have to back-engineer someone else's program when something does'nt work.



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