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View Full Version : .Net Advantage for an average PC user



iota
06-11-2005, 12:46 PM
Hi Masters,


May I know any .Net advantage for an average PC user?

Thank you so much.

JamieR
06-11-2005, 12:48 PM
Do you mean the advantages of installing the dotNet framework?

iota
06-11-2005, 01:04 PM
Do you mean the advantages of installing the dotNet framework?


Of course, Weazel :)

Gavin Crumpen
06-11-2005, 09:53 PM
Why could you have specified dotNet instead of .net?

JamieR
06-11-2005, 10:34 PM
...there is more than one way of specifying the .net (or dotNet) framework ;)

enumerator
06-12-2005, 01:45 AM
May I know any .Net advantage for an average PC user?
Let me guess... if the avg user followed the trail of hype, they'd be inundated w/ free apps (which may or may not be useful); a .Net advantage.

oracleguy
06-14-2005, 12:12 AM
The advantage is quite simple, you can run applications that were designed to use it thus have it as a pre-requisite before you can run the program.

ogden2k
06-19-2005, 12:38 AM
The advantage is quite simple, you can run applications that were designed to use it thus have it as a pre-requisite before you can run the program.
Exactly. A lot of little apps are starting to pop-up that require .NET FW.

enumerator
06-19-2005, 05:02 AM
Well duh, that's not really an advantage though, just a prerequisite (until some killer app comes along...).

oracleguy
06-19-2005, 05:35 AM
Well duh, that's not really an advantage though, just a prerequisite (until some killer app comes along...).

Riiight... its like asking whats the advantage of installing Java VM on your computer, the "advtange" and the purpose are one and the same.

mlse
06-19-2005, 10:39 AM
I don't like anything like .NET - it's all seems a bit too complicated for it's own good (the words "nut" and "sledgehammer" spring to mind ...). I went on a mandatory .NET training course with the company I used to work for, because the lame-brained half-wits in management thought it would be a good idea for all the engineers to learn how to use the newest over-hyped and under-usefull offering from that lovely company who's name begins with "M" (at a cost of over 1000 per engineer) - I did the C/C++ bit of the course and the main messages I got from it were as follows:

You can't use any of the trick bits of C++ that you're used to, because .NET doesn't support them.

You can instead use a new set of trick bits (which are actually non-trick bodges as far as I'm concerned) provided by .NET and exclusive to .NET.

The .NET C/C++ compiler wantonly violates pretty much every part of ANSI and ISO standards going ...

So that's my rant about .NET!

(Note to self - keep it simple, keep it open-source, keep it European, keep it Linux! :D).

iota
06-19-2005, 01:26 PM
You can't use any of the trick bits of C++ that you're used to, because .NET doesn't support them.

You can instead use a new set of trick bits (which are actually non-trick bodges as far as I'm concerned) provided by .NET and exclusive to .NET.

The .NET C/C++ compiler wantonly violates pretty much every part of ANSI and ISO standards going ...

(Note to self - keep it simple, keep it open-source, keep it European, keep it Linux! :D).

No doubt , .Net is the Micro$hot proprietary standard. They are imitating all and converting them into their own languages.

raf
06-19-2005, 02:45 PM
May I know any .Net advantage for an average PC user?
.Net applications can use the .Net-password which is supposed to guarantee some extra security and is more userfriendly.
In addition, the .Net authentication can be intagrated with other authenticationsystems (like for creditcards, pasports etc) which can add extra secutiy.
xample:
in Belgium, everybody is now getting a new digital pasport with a chip in it. there have already been meeting with Micosoft to enable people (that have a cardreader) to identify themselfs on .Net applications (like MSN etc) with their pasport. A bank could then for instance build their on-line services as a .Net application, and you would then only get access to it with your pasport.

mlse
06-19-2005, 11:18 PM
I reckon that's an emminently sensible idea - but one which is equally achievable with the use of pure programming & engineering standards and protocol specification (e.g. MIL standards & STANAGs) ... but then that debate could go on for ages ... !

raf
06-19-2005, 11:52 PM
i agree. i never said it was unique for .Net, but many big companys / countrys / etc will be more inclined to develop towards Microsoft-technology (for whatever reasons) + Microsoft spends a lott on promoting its tech and the possebilitys of it...

mlse
06-20-2005, 09:09 AM
Yes, I agree with your comment about people tending towards MS - which is a shame! They need to be re-educated ... (cracks knuckles).

enumerator
06-21-2005, 12:39 AM
As long as it works, the average user couldn't care less.

Kinda' like me... :)



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