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View Full Version : Font PT vs PX?



michael180
06-09-2005, 06:40 PM
I keep reading about point vs. pixel, and was wondering what others thought? My page..

http://www.moderntimes.com/

Is coded in points, but I was at a friends house and we checked it out on his Mac IE 5.0 and the type was about 6 sizes too large, I had to reduce it several times to get it to display correct? On my Mac it appears perfect.

The only thing I can think of is the points vs pixels.

Thanks,
Michael :confused:

mark87
06-09-2005, 06:42 PM
Pixels is not really a good way to specifiy font size, mostly because IE can't resize fonts which are in pixels. I don't know that best way but I normally use CSS sizes - small, x-small, medium, etc.

SilentDrive
06-09-2005, 06:42 PM
That will happen in IE or other browsers if the user has the view size set to anything different from yours. I highly suggest using CSS to define your text sizes so others can not change it. I had that problem with a lot of sites I was designing then this forum turned me on to CSS and it is a realitvely easy language to learn. Hope that helps.

Dolphin123
06-09-2005, 06:52 PM
%

Use % for on-screen so people with bad eyes can increase the text-size.

Pt's is better used for printing instead of pixels. (as far as I know, correct me if am wrong)

Donkey
06-09-2005, 06:57 PM
As well as % you could also use em's for the same reason.

Simonp
06-10-2005, 12:14 AM
Definitely do not use points, points are a print based font encoding and not good for screen or web at all.

Pixels are Ok technically, but as others have said they are fixed not relative, which means that users cannot scale the text to suit their needs.

Although this is a little scary from a design perspective, for many who have access issues and bad sight it is vital, or they will not be able to use your site all.

Allowing everyone to use is now a legal requirement in the UK, Europe and the US (and probably other places too).

Use, %, css or html values (xsmall, 1 to 7) or em's.

Of course you should use points if you use a style sheet to make a print version of your page.

_Aerospace_Eng_
06-10-2005, 12:56 AM
If you use pixels any browser but IE can still resize the text.

Graft-Creative
06-10-2005, 01:48 AM
I'd probably go with ems, then scale everything down by setting the font size for <body> in my CSS to 75-80%

%s you have to be careful because of inheritance: you may end up with text that is 75% of 75% of 75% etc etc.

Declaring font sizes in ems, then universally shrinking them all by declaring a single percentage value in the body element seems reasonable (from what I've read anyway) :)

Kind Regards,

Gary

michael180
06-10-2005, 01:55 AM
Thanks, Gary. Tell me how are you able to do the drop shadow the sides of your pages on the Foxhill site? I really like that.

Thanks,
Michael

Graft-Creative
06-10-2005, 02:21 AM
it's just a centered, fixed background mate ;)

Something like this: CSS;



body {
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
text-align: center;
background: white url(images/background1.jpg) fixed repeat-y center top;
}


Gary

michael180
06-10-2005, 02:28 AM
So how big is the background.jpg? It's not the entire page is it? I still can't figure it out?

But thanks,
Michael

_Aerospace_Eng_
06-10-2005, 02:39 AM
Its just a big background image at a resolution of 1024x746, you could also view the image directly to get this info.

Dolphin123
06-10-2005, 02:59 AM
Allowing everyone to use is now a legal requirement in the UK, Europe and the US (and probably other places too).


o.k. I knew it was mandatory in the states, didn't know for the other continents as well. I am all for it. :thumbsup: While we are sorta on the subject. How do you do that for braille readers then. Saw the css style for screen, all, braille, print, etc. If I set a stylesheet to 'all' it overrides the print stylesheet. So is it best to add some braille sheets to it? It is all for the better.

michael180
06-10-2005, 03:08 AM
Its just a big background image at a resolution of 1024x746, you could also view the image directly to get this info.
I know I'm going to get murdered here, but how do I view the background image. If I right click I don't get the option to view image. I thought I'd ask anyway.

Thanks :rolleyes:

sumeet
06-10-2005, 03:17 AM
There are several ways.

1) View the source, find where he imports his CSS from, view the CSS, find that image, load it into the browser, see it.

2) Download FireFox, right click on the image and select "View Background Image"

And while you're at it... get the Developer's Toolbar (https://addons.mozilla.org/extensions/moreinfo.php?application=firefox&category=Developer%20Tools&numpg=10&id=60)

_Aerospace_Eng_
06-10-2005, 03:27 AM
I know I'm going to get murdered here, but how do I view the background image. If I right click I don't get the option to view image. I thought I'd ask anyway.

Thanks :rolleyes:
Well you know the location of the image images/background1.jpg and you know his base url put them together and voila you have the image. I didn't link it here on the forums only because it could be considered hotlinking and I didn't want to be inconsiderate.

Bill Posters
06-10-2005, 09:56 AM
I started by using px units for fonts and will continue to use px as I consider them to be the most appropriate unit for a screen-based, graphical medium such as the web, where they offer designers the greatest amount of (initial) visual control.
I (perhaps foolishly) expect MS to pull their head out of their nether region and iron out this particular shortcoming by making px resizeable in MSIE/Win (just as the spec recommends) by the time they release IE7.



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