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View Full Version : How useful is it to have a server on your pc?



codegoboom
08-21-2004, 05:33 AM
Is that something only for developers, or can you also do a lot of stuff that can't be done with Explorer?

Kurashu
08-21-2004, 05:56 AM
I don't have a server on my computer, but I am installing PHP 5 on a seperate one not five feet from my computer to use as a test server. Why? Because I want a test area that I will have access to 24/7.

codegoboom
08-21-2004, 07:04 AM
That's interesting; it sounds like a development scenario.

I'm using Windows XP, which seems to be sort of web-based in the way the UI works, so I'm wondering if having a server would allow me to extend the OS in some specialized ways. There are lots of possibilites with Windows scripting technology, already, which is why I'm guessing these might be complimented by having server capabilities.

Is that likely?

A1ien51
08-24-2004, 02:14 AM
I personally enjoy having my laptop set up with IIS so I am able to take it and program where ever I want.

I also have other boxes set up for development so more then one person can access the code and data.

Pro with having it on a seperate box is having extra room to store information and not wasting your computers HD.

Con depending on your connection speed with the box, it may take afew extra seconds to load. (When you have a deadline a few seconds matter LOL)

It really is personal preference. If you want to install a UNIX based server then you need another box!

Eric

raf
08-29-2004, 11:15 AM
Is that something only for developers, or can you also do a lot of stuff that can't be done with Explorer?
I'd say it's for developpers only.
A webserver doesn't add extra functionaluty to your browser. The browser will just connect to the webserver on your localhost (your local machine) like it does on an internet-site.
If you are not hosting your own site then it's only usefull when developping webpages that are generated serversided. If you don't need it, then don't install it, because your webserver can be used by hackers to host sites you don't even know of (it once happened in a company i worked for that the trafic suddenly exploded. turned out someone managed to serve porn from that server ...) or to attack other sited from your machine.
Certainly IIS requires that you take extra precautions (firewall, regular updates and patched, ...) to avoid problems.

oracleguy
08-29-2004, 07:42 PM
I'd say it's for developpers only.
A webserver doesn't add extra functionaluty to your browser. The browser will just connect to the webserver on your localhost (your local machine) like it does on an internet-site.
If you are not hosting your own site then it's only usefull when developping webpages that are generated serversided. If you don't need it, then don't install it, because your webserver can be used by hackers to host sites you don't even know of (it once happened in a company i worked for that the trafic suddenly exploded. turned out someone managed to serve porn from that server ...) or to attack other sited from your machine.
Certainly IIS requires that you take extra precautions (firewall, regular updates and patched, ...) to avoid problems.

I agree with raf. Additionally, if you install softare like IIS and don't actually use it for anything, you are just using up more system resources by having more services running the background.

So unless you are developing webpages using a server-side language like ASP, PHP, CGI, etc. you really don't need to install any webserver or related software onto your computer.

codegoboom
08-30-2004, 04:31 AM
Thanks for the input, people.

I wasn't really thinking of adding extra functionaliy to IE, but rather to "Windows Explorer"--you know... something like a better way of organizing and searching data than the standard file system or shell provides (or maybe a virtual representation of that--like how the IE favorites menu stores and organizes shortcuts as if they were the actual files, yet the real data is safe...). I can probably figure something out using xml, scripts, and automation-objects, none the less.

SpiritualStorms
09-01-2004, 05:15 AM
I was sort of wondering about this:


If you don't need it, then don't install it, because your webserver can be used by hackers to host sites you don't even know of (it once happened in a company i worked for that the trafic suddenly exploded. turned out someone managed to serve porn from that server ...) or to attack other sited from your machine.


Is the above a general statement? Or is there additional facts to the main point? In other words, did the person with the server give access to others, and those others simply took advantage of the access? Or is the mere existance of a server a cause for a take over from a cybor pirate? I need to know, because i have been thinking of re-installing Apache (when i get around to it) as a means of perhaps testing PHP, and Perl.

raf
09-01-2004, 08:38 AM
Is the above a general statement? Or is there additional facts to the main point? In other words, did the person with the server give access to others, and those others simply took advantage of the access? Or is the mere existance of a server a cause for a take over from a cybor pirate? I need to know, because i have been thinking of re-installing Apache (when i get around to it) as a means of perhaps testing PHP, and Perl.
Yes it's a general statement. I wasn't involved with that servers maintenance or use so i don't know how it happened, but it was definitely a hacker who got write acces to the server and put his content there. It's the most extreme case i've seen myself, and it probably wasn't the best secured server, but it shows what you can face.
About 80% of all hacks(defaciations included) are due to webadmins that don't update frequently enough and leave there system open to known exploits, so that any scriptkiddy with a downloaded toy can show what a genius he is.

So if you don't need a webserver, then don't installone to save you the updatinghassle. If you do install one, then follow up on your patches and install a firewall.

Antoniohawk
09-02-2004, 02:53 AM
If I were to build a computer solely to serve as a server for mp3s and files, would it be possible to access the mp3s and files via the internet? Also, what does this entail by means of software?

I don't mean to steal your thread, so if I'm out of line, I'll just create a new thread.

codegoboom
09-08-2004, 08:37 AM
That's ok... no one seemed to understand what I was asking (as usual). I must be from Mars. :eek:

SpiritualStorms
09-08-2004, 08:51 AM
Well, not sure what a windows explorer is:


I wasn't really thinking of adding extra functionaliy to IE, but rather to "Windows Explorer"--you know... something like a better way of organizing and searching data than the standard file system or shell provides (or maybe a virtual representation of that--like how the IE favorites menu stores and organizes shortcuts as if they were the actual files, yet the real data is safe...). I can probably figure something out using xml, scripts, and automation-objects, none the less.


Also, have yu thought about maybe perhaps building your own OS? I dont know windows all that much, but i am reading a little, and seems like Visual C++ might be the way to go for something a bit more to your liking.

codegoboom
09-08-2004, 09:44 AM
Right-O, there's no way in oz that I could ever create an OS. :D

"Web servers" vs. "Windows servers": that's probably what's confusing me.

It's time now to see what sort of useful tinker toys I can assemble from the arsenal of installed MS technology that surrounds me...
starting here: Windows Server System Overview (http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserversystem/overview/overview.mspx)



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