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View Full Version : Preventing users to save my page...



Sven
07-25-2002, 01:13 AM
Hi,

I found a script that prevents users from saving images on my homepage with a right mouse click. But what if the user selects "File-->Save as...-->Web page complete" in Internet Explorer? This option saves the page with all the images.
So the question is: Is there a script that disables this option?

Thanks,
Sven

whammy
07-25-2002, 01:31 AM
Nope. There's nothing you can do to keep users from saving your images (or HTML or other client-side scripting such as javascript), once they have been viewed on their browser.

Sorry.

Astro-Boy
07-25-2002, 02:04 AM
This website goes over various page protections methods and their ultimate downfalls:

http://continue.to/hope/

- Mark

Sven
07-25-2002, 03:08 AM
whammy,

I've been to some sites I couldn't save. The option was simply "grayed out", so there must be a trick.

Astro-Boy,

thanks for the link. The site was down when I clicked it. I'll try it again later.

Astro-Boy
07-25-2002, 03:34 AM
The url is just a forwarder, it could be having prblems at the moment. Heres a direct link:

http://webhome.idirect.com/~bowers/copy/copy1.htm

- Mark

Gordo
07-25-2002, 03:59 AM
I've been to some sites I couldn't save. The option was simply "grayed out", so there must be a trick.
And those sites would be...???

Let me guess, you can't remember and/or failed to bookmark them!?

Roy Sinclair
07-25-2002, 05:32 AM
Originally posted by Sven
whammy,

I've been to some sites I couldn't save. The option was simply "grayed out", so there must be a trick.

Astro-Boy,

thanks for the link. The site was down when I clicked it. I'll try it again later.

You couldn't save it. That's only because you don't know the very simple tricks to get around such scripts. (The primary one being to disable Javascript in the first place).

Sven
07-25-2002, 06:30 PM
Gordo,

you're right, I can't remember them. :)

Roy Sinclair,

some sites are very "naughty". They won't let you in if you disable Javascript!

Spookster
07-25-2002, 08:36 PM
Sven,

People don't have to save the webpage. You must understand how the web works. In order to view a web page that page along with any images or other files attached to it must download to the users computer in order to even view the page. Upon visiting a page that page and all of its attached files will be saved into the users Temp Internet Files/ Cache directory.

Sven
07-25-2002, 08:59 PM
Originally posted by Spookster
Upon visiting a page that page and all of its attached files will be saved into the users Temp Internet Files/ Cache directory.
The following META-tag disables caching:

<META HTTP-EQUIV="Pragma" CONTENT="no-cache">

Spookster
07-25-2002, 09:28 PM
Originally posted by Sven

The following META-tag disables caching:

<META HTTP-EQUIV="Pragma" CONTENT="no-cache">

That is not supported in all browsers and what it does is remove the web page itself after leaving the page. The page still has to download to the Temp Internet Files/ Cache to be viewed.

So put that into a page then load the page into your browser and then go to your Temp Internet Files/ Cache directory and oila there is your page. Also note any images or other files will still be there regardless.

Roy Sinclair
07-25-2002, 10:09 PM
Originally posted by Sven
Gordo,

you're right, I can't remember them. :)

Roy Sinclair,

some sites are very "naughty". They won't let you in if you disable Javascript!

Did you know that you can use the Telnet program to emulate a browser? It's also not hard to find Perl scripts that can act as browsers. Once you can look at a page you can get the URL of the "real" page from it even if they've got trick code to try to intercept users with javascript disabled.

The bottom line is that what you've got on the web is absolutely not safe, because it has to be sent to the user in order for the user to be able to see it. Since it's has to be able to be sent to the user then it follows that the user can somehow intercept and keep a copy of it, the key being the determination of the user.

It's still a good idea to do what you can though, at least that way you can reduce the theft to a lower level. Beyond that, your only other option is pursuing legal recourses which may not be simple if the thieves are in another country.

Look at this site http://www.kdcgrohl.com/ and read it's "Site Protection" topic for a summary of a number of protection techniques.

Sven
07-26-2002, 04:51 PM
Originally posted by Roy Sinclair
The bottom line is that what you've got on the web is absolutely not safe, because it has to be sent to the user in order for the user to be able to see it. Since it's has to be able to be sent to the user then it follows that the user can somehow intercept and keep a copy of it, the key being the determination of the user.
From a technical standpoint it shouldn't be a problem to avoid disk-caching by keeping the data only in memory.

Thanks for the link, nice site. :)



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