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View Full Version : How do you prevent an image from losing quality when you save it?



TogetherWeRise
07-26-2011, 12:53 AM
note: i know this is in the wrong section, but i need help as soon as possible.

I made a logo for a website in adobe illustrator, (200x200 pixels). I zoomed in, and began working and i made a high quality logo, but then when i save it, it gets super blurry and loses quality. I've tried both export and "save for web and devices", and i've set the quality to maximum on everything, and no luck.

When i set the DPI to a higher amount, the logo increases in size way too much.

SO how do i do it? Thanks all who answer.

nandahosting
07-26-2011, 01:07 AM
it depends what your saving it as?

i always use .png as it has the best picture quality and supports transparant images

nandahosting
07-26-2011, 01:11 AM
if you are saving as .png then when you click file,export, save, change the "anti-aliasing" to none.

TogetherWeRise
07-26-2011, 01:16 AM
i would use PNG, but i've got a lot of white in the picture and the program takes it as a transparent. How can i remove that transparency?

nandahosting
07-26-2011, 01:18 AM
to remove the transparancy when you click export,save, change where it says "background, color" to white or any other color you want it to be

TogetherWeRise
07-26-2011, 01:19 AM
Nevermind, i just saved it as a PNG, and the quality is still bad.

Is it maybe because its a small 200x200px document?
should i instead start out big and just shrink it?

nandahosting
07-26-2011, 01:23 AM
would it be possible for you to send me the logo file (ie logo.ai)? and i will get it to maintain its quality. i havn't used illustrator in a while but will work it out. will let you know how then. thanks

mk1
08-21-2011, 03:54 PM
The first Thing I would say is you are right about one thing. Never ever start work on a low quality dpi (i.e. below 200) and smaller screen sizes.
They never will come up as good printable or viewable quality designs.

I have always taught my students to start with nothing less than 300 - 600 DPI screen and 3 times of the size they actually want the graphics to be in.

Lets suppose you wanted 200*200 logo size in design, always and always start with 600*600 Image size with minimum 300 DPI. If you dont do that, this is exactly the problem you will always face.

Now that you have already done it, I'd say go for exporting it into a PNG 24 and not any other format.
For transparency, you could try a Corel Plugin called Corel knockout, also works on PS.

Remember - You can always squeeze the designs to smaller seizes and dpi but can not do vice versa.

NOTE: Even if you are working on a Web Design, you need to begin with 300 DPI at the minimum.

tracknut
08-22-2011, 12:20 AM
You are not teaching your students correctly, unfortunately. It is the total size of the image (e.g. your 200x200 pixel logo, for example) which is the relevant size. Setting those 200 pixels to 1dpi, 100dpi, or 300dpi has absolutely zero effect on image quality, file size, or much of anything else. So yes, if they are making pixel-based images (as opposed to vectors in Illustrator), they need to make the image large to allow for shrinking down. But not via DPI changes; simply by reducing the overall image width & height.

I suspect in the OP's situation, he's talking about a 200x200 pixel file with bitmap graphics in it. That image can't be made larger (or have additional detail) without physically resizing the file (to say 400x400 pixels) then working on it.

Dave

webdev1958
08-22-2011, 01:42 AM
I have always taught my students to start with nothing less than 300 - 600 DPI screen and 3 times of the size they actually want the graphics to be in.


dpi/ppi (which are not the same thing although many use them interchangeably) is meaningless for screen display. dpi/ppi only affect hard copy print quality.

The only thing that matters for screen display are the overall pixel dimensions of the image. A 200px x 200px image on a given screen will take up the same amount of screen real estate (200x200px) and look exactly the same on the screen whether the image is 600ppi, 300ppi or 100ppi.

For printing an image I would suggest starting at 300ppi which means to make a "good quality" 6in x 4in print the original image needs to be at least 1800px x 1200px.

shumioe
09-08-2011, 10:04 AM
I am always prefer to save file in .png format.And here the image resolution will be maintained.

Waka
09-17-2011, 01:25 PM
I made a logo for a website in adobe illustrator, (200x200 pixels). I zoomed in, and began working and i made a high quality logo, but then when i save it, it gets super blurry and loses quality. I've tried both export and "save for web and devices", and i've set the quality to maximum on everything, and no luck.


So you're creating a logo? Illustrator is the right tool. You're creating vector logos in illustrator.. so pixels doesnt matter.

You want to use it on a website? Illustrator is not the right tool. Export the .ai file to .psd and open this .psd in Photoshot. Now you can "save for web" and choose different sizes ans file formats.

Waka :eek:

ANCH
09-29-2011, 04:05 PM
I went through something similar for my website logo. I ended up ignoring the "save as" for web and did regular quality. I did save it as a PNG file and uploaded it and that fixed the quality issue. It is bigger than I needed, but I was able to crop it on my website and make it work. It looks good.



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