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View Full Version : What are the most useful features in a third party plug-in performance tool?



cliffcrosland
02-09-2011, 03:39 AM
We are a group of Stanford students hoping to build a tool that measures third-party plug-in performance. A mocked-up prototype of the tool can be found at http://www.stanford.edu/~cliftonc/cgi-bin/

It's becoming more and more popular for publishers of prominent sites, such as Mashable and many media sites, to include third party web apps--for example, the Facebook "Like" button, or the Meebo Bar.

But it can often be difficult for publishers to tell how the third party code is effecting the performance of their site. Is the third party code slowing down their pages load time? Is it blocking the rendering of the page? Is it making too many asynchronous requests?

If anyone has any knowledge in this space--about what the pain points of a publisher using third party code are, about what features you would really like to see, or about what you like or dislike in this very early mockup, please let us know! We hope to build something useful for everyone.

Spudhead
02-10-2011, 10:33 AM
My two cents:

1. If you're competent enough to be hooking in multiple 3rd party API calls, and worrying about the performance hit, you're going to know about Firebug, ySlow, and how to use them. What functionality does your tool offer that other tools don't?

2. Facebook and several others do pretty much everything they can to reduce the friction of loading their API JS libraries; given a performance indication, what would you suggest people do with it? Petition their API provider for a better service?

3. Apologies for the pedantry, but you "affect" something, which has an "effect" on it. Sorry. I can't help it :o

oesxyl
02-10-2011, 11:01 AM
My two cents:

1. If you're competent enough to be hooking in multiple 3rd party API calls, and worrying about the performance hit, you're going to know about Firebug, ySlow, and how to use them. What functionality does your tool offer that other tools don't?

2. Facebook and several others do pretty much everything they can to reduce the friction of loading their API JS libraries; given a performance indication, what would you suggest people do with it? Petition their API provider for a better service?

3. Apologies for the pedantry, but you "affect" something, which has an "effect" on it. Sorry. I can't help it :o
:confused:


We are a group of Stanford students hoping to build a tool that measures third-party plug-in performance. A mocked-up prototype of the tool can be found at http://www.stanford.edu/~cliftonc/cgi-bin/

It's becoming more and more popular for publishers of prominent sites, such as Mashable and many media sites, to include third party web apps--for example, the Facebook "Like" button, or the Meebo Bar.

But it can often be difficult for publishers to tell how the third party code is effecting the performance of their site. Is the third party code slowing down their pages load time? Is it blocking the rendering of the page? Is it making too many asynchronous requests?

If anyone has any knowledge in this space--about what the pain points of a publisher using third party code are, about what features you would really like to see, or about what you like or dislike in this very early mockup, please let us know! We hope to build something useful for everyone.
the idea is great, :)

maybe this could extend the project to something less common:

http://mmt.me.uk/blog/2010/11/21/nhs-and-tracking/

best regards

Spudhead
02-11-2011, 10:43 AM
:confused:

Why the confusion?

oesxyl
02-11-2011, 11:42 AM
My two cents:

1. If you're competent enough to be hooking in multiple 3rd party API calls, and worrying about the performance hit, you're going to know about Firebug, ySlow, and how to use them. What functionality does your tool offer that other tools don't?
- firebug, yslow, that's all, everything was invented?
- their tools want to be online not some browser extension, this is first difference
- they ask what functionality we want to add, right?


2. Facebook and several others do pretty much everything they can to reduce the friction of loading their API JS libraries; given a performance indication, what would you suggest people do with it? Petition their API provider for a better service?
i agree, none of this companies doesn't care too much but having a tool online and people asking some questions can't be ignore so easy doesn't matter how big you are, right?


3. Apologies for the pedantry, but you "affect" something, which has an "effect" on it. Sorry. I can't help it :o
i didn't understand this, or more exactly i can't belive that is what i think i understand.


Why the confusion?
i read your posts starting with the day when i join this forum, sometimes i learned from you, i respect your opinion, including this, but i'm not agree.
i'm confused because i'm surprised, :).

best regards

Spudhead
02-11-2011, 12:56 PM
Fair enough :) I was a little harsh. I still reckon that anyone who cares enough to use this tool is going to be using Firebug and ySlow already - and that yes, everything was invented: there's not much more you can do to log and analyse website performace in this respect that you can't do with those tools. But I have been known to be both stupid and wrong.

The effect / affect thing: I apologise again, pulling people up on their English is usually a cheap trick, but this particular one is a bugbear of mine: when you affect something, you have an influence or impact on it. When you effect something you cause or produce it. When I see "x is effecting performance" I make a face like a cat eating a lemon.

oesxyl
02-11-2011, 08:31 PM
Fair enough :) I was a little harsh. I still reckon that anyone who cares enough to use this tool is going to be using Firebug and ySlow already - and that yes, everything was invented: there's not much more you can do to log and analyse website performace in this respect that you can't do with those tools.
can be used to mesure performance between you and the site, but what about the performance between two external sites? or a average between a site and a set of servers and results aggregated where the tool display the results.
Probably can be done a lot of other things we can't imagine now.


The effect / affect thing: I apologise again, pulling people up on their English is usually a cheap trick, but this particular one is a bugbear of mine: when you affect something, you have an influence or impact on it. When you effect something you cause or produce it. When I see "x is effecting performance" I make a face like a cat eating a lemon.
subtle, :)

best regards



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