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View Full Version : Firefox turns on HTML5 parser and more



drhowarddrfine
05-12-2010, 06:19 PM
Link (http://hacks.mozilla.org/2010/05/firefox-4-the-html5-parser-inline-svg-speed-and-more/comment-page-1/#comment-86974)
In the nightly builds, HTML5 is now native, along with inline SVG and MathML. HTML5 had to be turned on in about:config before but now is on by default. The new parser replaces the original HTML one which has been around since the '90s.

In other news, there will be no v3.7 but the next release will be v4.0. "Process-per-tab" will be turned on in v3.6.5, due this month.

bcarl314
05-12-2010, 06:48 PM
Nice! I may start working with HTML5 now to see what it can do! It's very promising, but I'm a little concerned it's being over hyped.

Any info on how good the CSS3 support is?

MattF
05-12-2010, 07:59 PM
What is the actual deal with HTML5? Not spent much time checking it out yet, but literally all I've seen mention of is a few extra tags and, well, that's about it. Am I missing something here?

oracleguy
05-12-2010, 08:43 PM
What is the actual deal with HTML5? Not spent much time checking it out yet, but literally all I've seen mention of is a few extra tags and, well, that's about it. Am I missing something here?
I think the aspect of HTML5 that people are most excited about or at least the aspect most hyped is the video tag. With it you wouldn't have to use flash for streaming video. However because the standard doesn't specify which video format the files have to be, having one video file work in all browsers isn't easy. Microsoft and Apple are going with H.264 and Mozilla is using Ogg Theora. I don't know what Google Chrome will support.

The canvas tag which was added in HTML5 could also be pretty cool too.

MattF
05-12-2010, 09:05 PM
Cheers. I'd pretty much read it correctly then. I was beginning to think I'd totally overlooked something in its spec with the amount of hype it seems to receive. Am I correct in thinking that XHTML is still a far more adaptable and extensible solution than HTML5?

Ain't it amazing how the browser creators can't even agree on something so simple as a video codec, btw. I'm sure they just play silly buggers for the sake of it. :D

drhowarddrfine
05-12-2010, 09:51 PM
Am I correct in thinking that XHTML is still a far more adaptable and extensible solution than HTML5?It always will be. XHTML using the HTML5 elements is called XHTML5 and works with it just fine.


Ain't it amazing how the browser creators can't even agree on something so simple as a video codec
On the one side you have Microsoft and Apple, co-owners of the H.264 patent. On the other side, you have Mozilla, Opera and Google who want to use Ogg/Theora, a patent free codec.

And on the third hand, Google bought On2, creators of an improved version of Ogg which everyone is expecting/hoping/wishing them to release patent/royalty free just for this purpose.

drhowarddrfine
05-12-2010, 09:54 PM
There's a lot more to this than just a few new elements. canvas is a new drawing element. video and audio will be built in. Errors by the rendering engines will be handled in a defined way. Microdata, drag/drop, offline storage, and on and on.

Most of this is available in the modern browsers, or the nightlies, today.

MattF
05-12-2010, 10:07 PM
It always will be. XHTML using the HTML5 elements is called XHTML5 and works with it just fine.

Cheers. Just wanted to double check on that point, merely for the fact that I've seen HTML5 labelled as the successor to XHTML and pretty much all variants of. That's why I was beginning to think I'd dropped the ball regarding HTML5, because some of the overbearing hype you see surrounding it makes it sound like the all-singing, all-dancing solution but without ever giving any information on how or why, and the specs seemed to contradict that opinion. Sounds like it's another typical zealot hype job on the go. :D



There's a lot more to this than just a few new elements. canvas is a new drawing element. video and audio will be built in. Errors by the rendering engines will be handled in a defined way. Microdata, drag/drop, offline storage, and on and on.

Most of this is available in the modern browsers, or the nightlies, today.

It sounds more like it's related to being able to drop a lot of the junk from the browser and deal with HTML the same way they deal with XML content then, i.e: it ain't valid it gets ignored or parsing stops dead type thing? They can literally drop all the legacy crap they had to deal with, (allowing for backwards compatibility of course). Plus the addition of some extra beneficial components.


Cheers for the info btw chaps. :)

Fumigator
05-12-2010, 10:12 PM
Link (http://hacks.mozilla.org/2010/05/firefox-4-the-html5-parser-inline-svg-speed-and-more/comment-page-1/#comment-86974)
In the nightly builds, HTML5 is now native, along with inline SVG and MathML. HTML5 had to be turned on in about:config before but now is on by default. The new parser replaces the original HTML one which has been around since the '90s.

In other news, there will be no v3.7 but the next release will be v4.0. "Process-per-tab" will be turned on in v3.6.5, due this month.

I found the "html5.enable" preference and set it to "true", restarted FF (3.6.3) but yet none of the canvas demos I googled seem to work.

My current pet project may really benefit from the canvas tag but I worry that IE has no support, zip zilch zero. How can I justify eliminating 60% of the userbase? (Though thinking about it, the people who would want to play my game would probably also be the sorts of people who would be comfortable ditching IE)

Fumigator
05-12-2010, 10:14 PM
Retraction, this one works:

http://www.andrew-hoyer.com/experiments/cloth

And it's sweet!

But see, this one doesn't:

http://9elements.com/io/projects/html5/canvas/

MattF
05-12-2010, 10:50 PM
My current pet project may really benefit from the canvas tag but I worry that IE has no support, zip zilch zero. How can I justify eliminating 60% of the userbase? (Though thinking about it, the people who would want to play my game would probably also be the sorts of people who would be comfortable ditching IE)

I'm totally missing the point of this canvas tag. From the W3Schools site:



The <canvas> tag is used to display graphics.

The <canvas> tag is only a container for graphics, you must use a script to actually paint graphics.


So ,what's the actual difference between <canvas></canvas> and <div class="canvas"></div>?

It's nothing more than a container, (with a tag named canvas), to anchor a script to, from what I can tell. Or, have I missed something?

Fumigator
05-12-2010, 10:54 PM
Hey Matt,

I'm going through Mozilla's canvas tag tutorial right now. You've missed something :D

Here:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Canvas_tutorial

p.s. did you see that cloth simulation I linked to above? That's amazing stuff for Javascript.

MattF
05-12-2010, 11:00 PM
Hey Matt,

I'm going through Mozilla's canvas tag tutorial right now. You've missed something :D

Here:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Canvas_tutorial


Cheers. I'll have a look at that. :)




p.s. did you see that cloth simulation I linked to above? That's amazing stuff for Javascript.

Yeah. Must admit, it is quite enthralling. Spent about five minutes playing with that cloth, then the particlesystems... :D Definitely looks the dogs nads.

thresher
05-13-2010, 05:02 PM
https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Canvas_tutorial


Nice tutorial there, thanks for the link!



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