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View Full Version : The $1930 Windows7 upgrade



drhowarddrfine
10-27-2009, 03:55 PM
Link (http://www.pcworld.com/article/174389/windows_7_the_1930_upgrade.html)

One analyst's estimate for the total cost of upgrading from XP to Windows 7 explains why the software industry has slowed down. .

oracleguy
10-27-2009, 04:21 PM
I think the transition to Windows 7 is going to happen primarily because of the 4GB memory barrier. I think that is going to motivate a lot of organizations. At least in a lot of places where people use their computers for actual intensive work.

I think that will be the biggest difference when compared to the Vista launch. Comparatively, 4GB is the new 2GB, 6GB is the new 4GB and 12GB is the new 8GB.

Not to say they couldn't use XP 64-bit. I use it at home and it works fine. But I am still planning on upgrading to Windows 7 64-bit around the new year. My reasoning is that XP is going to start either being dropped or neglected as far as driver support for new hardware. And having used Windows 7 RTM for the last 2 months (on a different computer), I actually like it a lot. It feels snappier than Vista and some of the new UI changes are really nice.


I totally forgot about that article's assertion that OS X will be the new default corporate desktop. That is the most ridiculous thing to assert. I'm not slamming OS X but if an organization is worried about some minor problems and costs moving to a newer version of the same platform, it'd be impossible for them to transition to a new platform without great expense (especially with Apple hardware). I'm not saying it can't happen but if cost is the biggest issue, it puts Apple out of the running. At least moving to Linux would allow organizations to re-use existing hardware.

Other than that, the article is a decent read.

drhowarddrfine
10-27-2009, 07:33 PM
I totally forgot about that article's assertion that OS X will be the new default corporate desktop. That is the most ridiculous thing to assert.

He's not. He only brings it up as a possiblity but he "won't even go there".

brad211987
10-28-2009, 03:27 AM
Certainly an interesting article, many valid points. I would like to see a more detailed breakdown of the numbers though. They are probably not far off in the average case, but all I have to speak of with Windows 7 is my own experience thus far, which has been great. I was stuck with Vista for a good 8-10 months when I discovered my laptop does not downgrade to XP due to lack of drivers. After Vista, Windows 7 is a huge breath of fresh air. I went from 32 bit Vista to 64 bit 7, had to re-install applications, but all of my data was kept, had not a single driver issue, networking issues that plagued me in Vista are gone, and the user experience is very much improved.

Nevertheless, I'm a technical user and the organization cost for me upgrading is minimal, when you factor in hardware(in many but not all cases), software costs, IT labor, and staff training, the cost climbs fast. This is actually one of the main selling points for Google Apps, the ability to constantly upgrade instead of packing 6-8 years of upgrades in one punch to non-technical users.

seco
10-28-2009, 04:04 AM
it cost me like, $200, well i spent $200 on new ram, cpu and board. dont see how it would cost almost $2k, seriously.

Fumigator
10-28-2009, 04:13 AM
Big corporations may have to upgrade critical software; other than that, all that other stuff the author mentioned is going to be part of a corporation's overhead anyway, whether they are upgrading the workstation OS or not.

brad211987
10-28-2009, 01:06 PM
it cost me like, $200, well i spent $200 on new ram, cpu and board. dont see how it would cost almost $2k, seriously.


Your an individual user that did the work yourself. Look at it from the perspective of an IT department in a medium sized company:



Hardware upgrades if needed(many companies still use systems built for windows 2k, and early xp systems)
Software costs (windows 7 itself, plus any other version upgrades needed for office or other products used internally)
IT time and resources, they don't work for free.
User Re-training, if the computer doesn't function "EXACTLY" as it did before, most non-technical users go absolutely insane. I once had a support call that someone could not open their excel spreadsheet, the problem? The icon was moved to a different spot on her desktop.
Down-time for the upgrades for individual users, certain departments have a hard time parting with their systems even for 10 minutes. Any time lost for these people is money lost.


Fumigator is exactly right though, many costs here are something that is to be expected with any major upgrade. As oracleguy mentioned, the Windows 7 upgrade will still be much cheaper than a move to a new platform. In the end, they are eventually going to have to upgrade to something, and Windows 7 64 bit is going to be my bet.

Apostropartheid
10-28-2009, 11:39 PM
I didn't read the article (subject explains it all really, doesn't it?), but does anyone have an idea how much it would have taken to upgrade from XP to Vista for comparison? Or even 2000 to XP?

funnymoney
11-02-2009, 11:13 AM
But I am still planning on upgrading to Windows 7 64-bit around the new year. My reasoning is that XP is going to start either being dropped or neglected as far as driver support for new hardware.

if I'm not mistaking, lifetime warranty of Win XP is until 2014, plenty of time to wait for more powerful computer to invest money in.

my current p4 2.4Ghz, is from 2003 or 04 not sure, but still runs OK. i hope it will live for the next 5 years, and then it will be replaced with new hardware and software. so until 2014 no new hardware for me :thumbsup:

bazz
11-02-2009, 12:54 PM
User Re-training, if the computer doesn't function "EXACTLY" as it did before, most non-technical users go absolutely insane. I once had a support call that someone could not open their excel spreadsheet, the problem? The icon was moved to a different spot on her desktop.


I wonder if, at some stage, employers will see the value in fuller training so that such changes aren't so scary or obstructive for their staff.

As I think you rightly said,


Down-time for the upgrades for individual users, certain departments have a hard time parting with their systems even for 10 minutes. Any time lost for these people is money lost.


So training would be a worthwhile investment.


bazz

oracleguy
11-02-2009, 03:21 PM
if I'm not mistaking, lifetime warranty of Win XP is until 2014, plenty of time to wait for more powerful computer to invest money in.

You are making the assumption that hardware vendors will bother creating and maintaining XP drivers until 2014. They are under absolutely no obligation to.



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