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View Full Version : JavaScript string variables



sundance
07-08-2002, 06:34 PM
I have noticed that when I place a string with quotes within another quote, browser gets confused, For example:

var test='This is a test for another "<b>Test</b>" from another "<a>world</a> and another time';

When I use the test variable in the JS, string doesn't appear in the browser. If I use a simple variable w/ no quotes or tags inside, string appears fine.

I'm using IE 6.0.26

Bosko
07-08-2002, 06:42 PM
If the string starts with a double quote (") you can use single quotes inside the string,and you have to escape the double quotes.

var test="This is a test for another \"<b>Test</b>\" from another \"<a>world</a> and another time";

sundance
07-08-2002, 07:25 PM
Can't I use double quotes within double quotes with escape character?

premshree
07-08-2002, 08:53 PM
I would suggest that if you use special characters, instead of using the character itself, it would be better to use the codes for them. For eg the double quote(") has a code &quot;

Codes for other characters are also available.

sundance
07-08-2002, 09:14 PM
Can you please explain in an example what you mean by code?

ObiwanJebroni
07-08-2002, 09:58 PM
The code of a character is an ampersand (&) followed by its code, followed by a semicolon ( ; ). For instance to get the copyright symbol, you enter:


& + copy + ;

You'd write that all together without the plus signs, its just that this forum accepts the code and changes them so you can't see the code.

Which results in &copy;.

The code for the quotes he's referring to is ampersand, followed by the word "quot" and the semicolon. Just insert that and it will produce a quote that is automatically escaped in HTML. See:

&quot;I used the code for quotes!&quot;

sundance
07-09-2002, 10:57 PM
Where can I get the listing of these codes? Is there a webpage?

adios
07-09-2002, 11:03 PM
Resource:

http://www.bbsinc.com/symbol.html

Their actual name is "character entities".

I don't get this thread: your original question was a perfectly good one and, yes, you can escape (literal) quotes within other (delimeter) quotes easily, Bosko's original answer.



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