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View Full Version : traffic light for network traffic help.



dajohnson1s
11-20-2008, 12:43 AM
Hello,

I have an idea about making a traffic light (red yellow and green) to show the network stability. But I really am at a loss of how to begin or where to draw inspiration.

I would appreciate any help.

thanks.

oesxyl
11-20-2008, 01:20 AM
Hello,

I have an idea about making a traffic light (red yellow and green) to show the network stability. But I really am at a loss of how to begin or where to draw inspiration.

I would appreciate any help.

thanks.
define network stability. It's not clear for me what this means.

regards

_Aerospace_Eng_
11-20-2008, 03:35 AM
How would you know when it would be yellow? What would determine each color? I think you need to start there.

dajohnson1s
11-20-2008, 07:19 AM
Sorry for the lack of detail. For whatever reason I couldnt even fathom how to start.

What I was thinking was yellow would indicate some planned event. Red signifies there is an issue...green is good.

"Stability" probably wasnt the correct term. I remember as a freshman in the dorms there was a squirrel issue on campus...and depending on which door was left open power would go out or the network would go down. The issue today is more about their isp being 60-100 miles away and there being a "problem somewhere else" as it is now put to the students. So the intranet still functions mostly.

And instead of CALLING the help desk (mostly student workers that are not in the loop) I think it would be nice to have an admin or whoever have something online to signify what it taking place.

this is what i had in mind (http://8help.osu.edu/status.php), but I am not very sure if this is just a form that allows the user to check what color they would like and then make a note of what is taking place.

It appears as something of a network monitor is popular at many universities.

I am just unsure if this would be something out of the range of a 1-3 person operation (commerical software) or if this is something relatively simple that I could accomplish in a month or two.

oracleguy
11-20-2008, 08:46 AM
Well you could make it dynamic on the page (using a server side language) where someone has to manually update a text file to indicate what the current status is. Or if you wanted to get more involved, you could have a database where the network admins could enter in when planned maintenance was supposed to happen and the web page could use that to determine when to switch to yellow from green. And then have some sort of override that could be set to show red.

gnomeontherun
11-20-2008, 08:54 AM
My university had something similar, but it was only red or yellow because of a notice put up by the IT guys or girls. It wasn't actually all that reliable, but it helped to find out when issues might be resolved by. So it was human edited.

oesxyl
11-20-2008, 02:49 PM
Sorry for the lack of detail. For whatever reason I couldnt even fathom how to start.

What I was thinking was yellow would indicate some planned event. Red signifies there is an issue...green is good.

"Stability" probably wasnt the correct term. I remember as a freshman in the dorms there was a squirrel issue on campus...and depending on which door was left open power would go out or the network would go down. The issue today is more about their isp being 60-100 miles away and there being a "problem somewhere else" as it is now put to the students. So the intranet still functions mostly.

And instead of CALLING the help desk (mostly student workers that are not in the loop) I think it would be nice to have an admin or whoever have something online to signify what it taking place.

this is what i had in mind (http://8help.osu.edu/status.php), but I am not very sure if this is just a form that allows the user to check what color they would like and then make a note of what is taking place.

It appears as something of a network monitor is popular at many universities.

I am just unsure if this would be something out of the range of a 1-3 person operation (commerical software) or if this is something relatively simple that I could accomplish in a month or two.
try to write some use cases. Usualy this help because make more clear what you have in mind. As far I understand is like a combination of a ticket system, a specific classification for it and a intuitive and simple system of markup..
Sound interesting, :)

best regards

dajohnson1s
11-20-2008, 08:04 PM
thanks for all the help.

Never really thought the stuff taught in Software Engineering would payoff (usecases ...). Ill plan it out a little more.

I wasn't sure if there was a way to "automate" this process. Still the only way i see this possible is to have a person make the change. I have never really made any software that would interact with hardware.

Anyway. Thanks again.

oesxyl
11-20-2008, 08:45 PM
thanks for all the help.

Never really thought the stuff taught in Software Engineering would payoff (usecases ...). Ill plan it out a little more.
was invented to help designers not to torture students, :)


I wasn't sure if there was a way to "automate" this process. Still the only way i see this possible is to have a person make the change. I have never really made any software that would interact with hardware.

Anyway. Thanks again.
it's more easy to intereact with hardware then people, :) Different people have different reaction in same context, hardware not, is predictible, :)

best regards

oracleguy
11-21-2008, 03:40 AM
I wasn't sure if there was a way to "automate" this process. Still the only way i see this possible is to have a person make the change. I have never really made any software that would interact with hardware.

Depending on what you want to monitor exactly, there can be ways to make it automated.

dajohnson1s
11-22-2008, 08:26 PM
Ok, so I had spoken to another person in the Alumni building. What he suggested, since I know there is a webserver, another for banner and another for class websites. I could simply ping those server and check the response...

if they are down...change to red.
Not sure what yellow would indicate, maybe scheduled maintenance.

What I would like to do is check when they (these servers) are down. And just for laughs keep a ratio of up time vs down time.

So I am now curious, would ping be the better way to go about this?

oracleguy
11-22-2008, 08:34 PM
So I am now curious, would ping be the better way to go about this?

Pinging could work, however a better solution would be write some software (or use some existing one) that would run on each server you want to monitor and it would report to the heartbeat server.

This has several advantages:
1) This will work even if one of your network segments is configured to block ICMP messages
2) You can actually monitor the web services on the server and if they go down, try to restart them before reporting an issue
3) The heartbeat server can send out an alert to whoever needs to fix it reporting the exact glitch. (e.g. the server is running but apache won't start back up)
4) You could also have support for monitoring other aspects of the computer: CPU temp, fan speed, etc. and if they go out of range before the server's failsafes kick in, it can be reported.

oesxyl
11-22-2008, 09:24 PM
traceroute family tools, this could give you a lot of info about net.
yellow -> net is slow, :)
depend of how much time you want to spend developing this you can make it simpler ot complicated. :)

best regards



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