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View Full Version : client- & server-side web apps



BobLewiston
11-09-2008, 04:43 AM
Please excuse what may be a very stupid question from a onetime programmer who is very seriously considering trying to break back into the industry:

In today's web-based technologies, client-side apps run in browsers and are typically written in Java, Perl, Javascript, etc., and server-side apps run on website servers and are typically written in .NET languages such as C#, right?

oesxyl
11-09-2008, 01:57 PM
Please excuse what may be a very stupid question from a onetime programmer who is very seriously considering trying to break back into the industry:

In today's web-based technologies, client-side apps run in browsers and are typically written in Java, Perl, Javascript, etc., and server-side apps run on website servers and are typically written in .NET languages such as C#, right?
client-side app, yes run in browser but only javascript, java and other jangauages interpreted by browser. As a clue to guess which language are client-side you need a plugin/extension instaled by client or native suport from browser.
server-side app, anything runing on the server, perl, php often, rarely .net and c#.

regards

BobLewiston
11-09-2008, 04:33 PM
oesxyl:

Can you tell me on what platforms .NET and C# are typically run (and, if possible, in what kinds of applications)?

oesxyl
11-09-2008, 04:46 PM
oesxyl:

Can you tell me on what platforms .NET and C# are typically run (and, if possible, in what kinds of applications)?
microsoft stuff, is their invention. I don't know much about this subject, I don't use it now and never used before. I can tell you that can run and can be developed such apps also in a linux enviroment because I know that are some application writen in .net and c# for linux.
There are on this forum users who work with them and probaly they can help you more then I can do, :)

best regards

BobLewiston
11-09-2008, 05:02 PM
Thanks for your help. I clicked on the "Thank User for this helpful post" button, but got back a vBulletin saying I didn't have permission to access that page. (?)

Anyway, by "microsoft stuff", you mean under Windows, right? Then what op sys's are usually run on website servers?

oesxyl
11-09-2008, 05:15 PM
Thanks for your help. I clicked on the "Thank User for this helpful post" button, but got back a vBulletin saying I didn't have permission to access that page. (?)
you have javascript disabled, :)


Anyway, by "microsoft stuff", you mean under Windows, right? Then what op sys's are usually run on website servers?
with this expression I try to avoid to say something wrong, :)
I was thinking to windows, microsoft servers, don't realy know what to say here but this is the idea that .net and c# run better on this.( I guess).

best regards

BobLewiston
11-10-2008, 04:51 PM
At 11-09-2008 01:57 PM you said:

"As a clue to guess which languages are client-side you need a plugin / extension installed by client or native support from browser."

I don't understand. Could you elaborate on this?

NancyJ
11-10-2008, 06:18 PM
Most client-side applications are javascript based (though many rely heavily on ajax to pass data silently between the client and something running server-side). Some client-side applications are Java but it isn't that common these days. Flash is gaining ground in the 'application' market (as opposed to the silly flash animation/game/annoying media site market), again, a lot of the heavy lifting will be done by a server-side back end and requests will be sent between the flash application and the server-side.

There are very few 'applications' that are entirely client-side, largely because their usefulness is limited, anything done in the application is lost as soon as you close the browser, which is fine for small apps like calculators, where once you have your answer, you have no need to store the data server-side but most dynamic web applications use both server and client-side technologies.

PHP is the most commonly used server-side language, largely because its free and very well documented. ASP.net is a lot less popular for many reasons. (on the plus side of that, jobs in ASP.net have much less competition and pay higher than PHP jobs generally). Theres also Ruby on Rails which a lot of developers have taken a 'wait and see' attitude to, its great if you're already fluent in Ruby but there are now a load of railsesque php frameworks out there that are just as good if you're already a php developer. There's also classic ASP which I still see much more frequently than aspx but I wouldn't recommend it.



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