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View Full Version : Not sure my college is good for Programming



Shirosaki
06-28-2007, 03:39 AM
I need some advice maybe from people who have gotten their degrees and know stuff about computer programming degrees and what employers look for. I want to talk to some different companies about getting a computer programming degree at this college and if its good or not. If you know some large companies that I could search for I'd appreciate it.

The reason I'm having trouble is I read this article on my college and it being sued for misleading its students. Apparently people would get their associates there and try to transfer to another college and none of their credits would transfer over. Apparently they were told they would have no problem transfering. I was planning on getting my bachelor's in Computer Information Science. Very computer programming heavy, I'm told. I just started there so I haven't spent a lot of money. I'm concerned because if their associates degrees are worthless when transfering to other colleges, then how good are their bachelors and stuff for getting good jobs? The college is Florida Metropolitan University or FMU.

Article is here http://www.orlandoweekly.com/features/story.asp?id=526

Not sure if companies would take the time to tell me if a degree at this college would be worth hiring or not. I believe its ACICS accredited. The level of school there is very low. The hardest math on their placement test was dividing fractions no algebra. I think any middle schooler could probably have passed their test. Also the classes, even though I'm only in the first 2, are suspiciously easy.

Anyways any help on this would be greatly appreciated. I'm young and a little unknowledgable about this stuff and don't really know anyone to ask. I feel like if I ask the school they won't tell me the truth.

kewlceo
06-28-2007, 04:04 AM
I would spend more time finding a school that has the goods. Your degrees will only be one component to get you hired, you'll also need to back it up with knowledge. The tests for FMU may be easy, but your prospective employers will have tougher tests up their sleeves. And getting a job is one thing, but keeping it is another, so, the bottom line is to make sure you get yourself as well educated as possible before hitting the streets. In other words, your future employer may not know the cons about FMU, but you better have what it takes when you do get hired.

Shirosaki
06-28-2007, 04:36 AM
Is there anyway to make sure their programming classes are any good? Like I know they teach Java, C++, Visual Basic, C#. You get to choose like 3 out of 4 of those or something. Is there some form of programming or something I should ask the head of the department about their classes that they should have? The classes I'm taking are required but they are meant to ease adults who work and have jobs back into school. I know this but I don't want to pay for more classes if I can figure out how good their degrees are or whether their classes will educate me properly.

sage45
06-28-2007, 03:48 PM
I really don't think that you should base this decision solely on whether they have good VB or Java classes.

Programming is so much more than just knowing the language, it is about understanding the concepts behind the language. Why do you use this structure here? Is there a more efficient way of writing this block of code?

If all you want to do is just learn the language, then you could do just as much by just buying a book. But if you want to learn to program, then make sure that the school you are attending does more than just the language. Make sure that they delve into the math and science behind the language.

-saige-

oracleguy
06-28-2007, 04:24 PM
I agree with sage.

Well what programming classes do they offer? Like do you have a link to their course guide for your major?

Shirosaki
06-28-2007, 04:37 PM
This list is kind of long but
Can't find a link. Their website kind of sucks.

College algebra

Major Course Requirements:

Principles of Accounting 1 and 2
Applied Business Law
Computer Networking Fundamentals
Computer Applications
Computer Operating Systems
Computer Hardware Concepts
Programming Concepts
Fundamental Programming Techniques
Introduction to the Systems Development Life Cycle
All the Language course are 2 classes for each. You pick 3 languages I believe

Upper Division Courses:

Database Concepts
Structured Query Language
Database Application Development
Designing SEcure Software
Object -oriented Analysis and Design
Survey of Operating Systems
Senior Project - Systems analysis and design
Senior Project - Systems Implementation and Integration


These look like all the required math and computer classes for the Bachelor's degree
I know the program has changed a little bit from this and has a couple more classes than this cause I saw the head of the departments outline for the degree and it had a couple different things. He said they try to update the degree requirements every 18 months to 2 years or something like that.

sage45
06-28-2007, 08:21 PM
Here is the curriculum for my degree program:
Computer Science BA BS
CS 101 Prob. Solv. & Prog. I 3 3
CS 191 Discrete Structures I 3 3
CS 201 Prob. Solv. & Prog. II 3 3
CS 281 Intro. to Computer Arch. 3 3
CS 282 Assembler Language Prog. 3 3
CS 291 Discrete Structures II 3 3
CS 304WI Ethics and Professionalism 3 3
CS 352 Data Structures & Algorithms 3 3
CS 393 Numerical Analysis &
Symbolic Computation - 3
CS 394R Applied Probability - 3
CS 421 Found. of Data Networks - 3
-or-
CS 420 Introductory Network Models
and Interconnections - 3
CS 431 Intro. to Operating Systems - 3
CS 441 Prog. Lang. Design & Impl. 3 3
CS 470 Intro. Database Mgmt. Systems - 3
-or-
CS 471 Database Design, Implementation
and Validation - 3
CS 481 Advanced Computer Arch. 3 3
CS Advanced Electives * 6 6
Minimum Requirement 36 51

* CS regular courses numbered 400-499


General Education Synthesis
CS 451 Software Engineering 3 3


Mathematics
MATH 210 Calculus I 4 4
MATH 220 Calculus II 4 4
MATH 250 Calculus III - 4
MATH 235 Elementary Statistics - 3
MATH 235 or CS 394R or MATH 436 3 -
Minimum Requirement 11 15


Communicating
ENGL 110 Freshman English I 3 3
ENGL 225 Freshman English II 3 3
COMS 110 Fundamentals of Speech 3 3
WEPT 0 0
Minimum Requirement 9 9


Humanities and Fine Arts
Elective: Engl, CommSt, Phil
or Foreign Language 3 3
Elective: Art/Art History, Conservatory
or Theater 3 3
Minimum Requirement 6 6


Life and Physical Sciences
PHYS 240 and 250 - 10
One course in one of the following:
Physics, Chemistry or Biology 4-5 -
Life Science Course 3 3
Minimum Requirement 7-8 13


Social and Behavioral Sciences
HIST 101, 102, 360R or POLSC 210 3 3
(Meets MO constitution requirement)
Two courses from at least two fields:
Criminal Justice, Geography, Economics,
History, Political Science, Psychology,
Social Science or Sociology 6 6
Minimum Requirement 9 9


Foreign Language
FRNLG 110 or 1 year H.S. study 0-4 -
FRNLG 120 or 2 years H.S. study 0-4 -
Culture Course(Independent Global Env.) 3 -
Minimum Requirement 3-11 -


General Electives
Additional coursework to complete the
credit hours needed for graduation
Minimum Requirement 28-36 12-16

Total Minimum Requirement: 120 120HTH,

-saige-

brad211987
06-28-2007, 09:18 PM
My advice would be to find another program at another school if you doubt the one your in. Having confidence in your school and program, can make a huge difference in your attitude towards learning, and you will get more out of a program that you like.

Shirosaki
06-28-2007, 09:36 PM
This kind of gives me an idea. Maybe I can call the regular universities and talk with their Head of the Computer Department.

Can I ask what school you're going to?

Also I asked them if Calculus was important for Programming and they said it wasn't. So is that true or are they lying and it helps a lot?

Thanks for the help so far, its just I'm like a freshman right now and I don't know much about programming at all, except this school has a degree for it and its really math and logic heavy to create programs that do certain functions and stuff.

Didn't see above post. I think you're right so I'm going to have to talk to their head about their courses and see what the hiring rate for programmers there is and maybe how much they make after they get their degrees.

TheShaner
06-28-2007, 09:44 PM
Here is the curriculum for my degree program:
...HTH,

-saige-

Discrete Structures II = :thumbsup: Our Discrete Structures II class was called Formal Languages. Talk about mind-blowing computer theory and proofs! :eek: Creating Turing machines and using inductive proofs on formal languages... ick! haha It was still fun tho.

I'm surprised your curriculum doesn't have a programming language class as a requisite. I didn't either when I started our Computer Science curriculum, but two years later, CS majors had to take at least a C, C++, or Java class. I graduated 3 years ago, but I don't believe it's changed much since I graduated.

@Shirosaki:
I went to the University of Central Florida and they're rated as one of the best computer science, computer engineering, and electrical engineering in the southeast, if not higher now. Great program, tho I still don't believe they prepared me enough for the outside world (get yourself an internship!) You can always do a community college for two years for your AA and then you'll be accepted into any public university for your last two years. I don't know much about FMU, so I can't help you there.

As for Calculus, we were required to go up to Calc II, although no, you don't use it in programming. They just want you to have a strong mathematical background because mathematics and programming go hand-in-hand. But since I was taking so many math classes anyway for my major, I just finished it off with a Minor in Math. It was like two extra classes, hehe.

-Shane

brad211987
06-28-2007, 10:09 PM
(get yourself an internship!)
Best advice so far, and I totally agree. Nothing beats experience.


As for Calculus, we were required to go up to Calc II, although no, you don't use it in programming.

We go up to Calc II also. I would say Calc is important, and you'll use it some, especially depending on the time of programming you do. There are some fundamental concepts that can be applied to programming ideas as well. Its not the most important, but I wouldn't go without it.

Shirosaki
06-28-2007, 10:14 PM
I'm very strong at math and logic, and I'm interested in computers. I built the computer I have now. Thats how I chose computer programming or some kind of computer science job.

I may have to do that and according to that article their associates degrees don't transfer over to other colleges, so I'd have to find another community college.

If you get an AA from a community college, do you go into any programming classes in that first 2 years or do they come all after at the regular college? So I guess what I'm saying is can you get all those math requirements and programming requirements done in 2 regular years?

Fumigator
06-28-2007, 10:22 PM
In my experience, it's what you actually know that makes the difference in getting (and keeping) a job-- not what education you list on your CV. Quite honestly, of the people I went to school with, the ones who went on to be successful computer programmers were the same ones who were already tinkering with computers and programming before they enrolled. If you're expecting college to make you an "expert", you'll probably be disappointed.

The sad truth is, knowing how to nail an interview is almost as important as knowing how to program! The main questions an interviewer wants answers to is "Can you do the job?", "Can I afford you?", and "Do you fit in with this company?" Only one of those questions has anything to do with your programming abilities.

If you feel you do indeed have an aptitude for (and a love of) programming, then I would suggest you enroll in your local community college and take a systems design course and a programming course and constantly evaluate the coursework-- be honest with yourself and determine if it is the right choice for you.

oracleguy
06-28-2007, 10:27 PM
Also I asked them if Calculus was important for Programming and they said it wasn't. So is that true or are they lying and it helps a lot?

A lot of computer science and computer engineering programs make you take up to at least integral calculus. I definitely would say it isn't something you will probably use everyday. However it does provide a strong math background. All in all, I'd say that part of it is rather valuable since it does help build other skills as well.

Shirosaki
06-29-2007, 02:08 AM
Thanks for the information. I appreciate it. Is there any kind of resource on computer programming that can help you get a feel for it and what it involves without it being a class? Like I know that Computer Programming is basically writing lines of code for a program to provide certain functions, etc. But I haven't really seen the mechanics of it first hand.

When you apply for jobs do they give you certain problems to solve along with your application?

Is there anything that you would recommend learning before graduating? Like anything advanced? Not just the regular stuff everyone learns? I plan on confronting the head of the computer science department and if I know some things that a person needs to learn I can ask him if its taught in his course outline.

@Shaner
You said that you didn't feel you were prepared. Can you maybe tell me what they could have taught you in general to help you prepare better? I'm also not familiar with internships. Can you get those even if you just started at college or would you have to atleast know a language and have taken that at school?



Sorry if all these questions are annoying and noobish. Its just I don't know anyone in this field atm and I'm trying to get a feel for what I should expect to learn and need to know for real world. I'm a little stressed out cause I've already spent like 2k on them and a bachelors would probably cost 50-60k there.

oracleguy
06-29-2007, 06:15 AM
As far as job interviews go, in any technical field they usually give you some problems to solve if they call you into an interview. It depends on the job and more on who is giving it, different people have different ideas.

In the past it is usually has been some combination of verbal questions and like writing some code out either on a computer or white board for me. At least that is what I've seen. And the questions aren't all technical they still give you usually a lot of the typical interview questions.

As far as an internship: An internship is a job you get at a company while you are in school. It is a pretty good learning experience because it gives you a chance to apply the things that you've learned in the real world. And usually you learn a skill or two more during your internship that might help you in school. And maybe even more importantly it lets you establish contacts in industry that you can use later when job hunting.

And if you don't get a chance to program in your first year to year and half, IMO I'd be worried because that is when you are going to know if you even like doing it. I knew lots of people in school that thought they wanted to be programmers but once they actually had to program, hated it and switched majors.

TheShaner
06-29-2007, 02:06 PM
As far as an internship: An internship is a job you get at a company while you are in school. It is a pretty good learning experience because it gives you a chance to apply the things that you've learned in the real world. And usually you learn a skill or two more during your internship that might help you in school. And maybe even more importantly it lets you establish contacts in industry that you can use later when job hunting.
I second all that. Unfortunately, I didn't do that and it hurt me. One of the most important job qualifiers is EXPERIENCE! It shows employers that you've proved yourself in a working environment. Fresh out of college with nothing but a degree shows them you have the knowledge, but not the aptitude to adapt and thrive in a working environment. I should know because that was me when I graduated and I was denied many jobs due to it.

As for what did they not prepare me for, well, solving real life problems and putting everything you've learned into completing a project. I also think web coding should become mandatory now in Computer Science, but it's not. Ecommerce is HUGE and I believe all CS curriculums should require at least one class delving into that world. One possible job I had lined up was going to be doing Java work for a company that provided hotel reservation software. Not only did I need to know Java though, I had to know JSP, EJBs, java servlets, XML, etc. I knew how to program in Java and that's it. No surprise that I didn't get that job. Also, in the CS curriculum, you learn mostly theory and it then becomes up to you to apply that theory to your real world situations. I got sick of theory and really wanted a "work simulated" class. That's where an internship comes in. Even my Robot Vision class where we used C to write programs that analyzed pictures (tangent lines, skin color recognition, face recognition, object outlining, etc.), we were given all the equations that solved these problems (this is where basic trig and calc can be applied!) and solved nothing ourselves.



And if you don't get a chance to program in your first year to year and half, IMO I'd be worried because that is when you are going to know if you even like doing it. I knew lots of people in school that thought they wanted to be programmers but once they actually had to program, hated it and switched majors.
Shiro, you said you've put together your computer. Do not associate that with CS. As OG mentions above, people THINK they want to program but once they take one or two programming courses, most drop out. It's also usually a tough curriculum. We were required to take a Foundation Exam in order to proceed in the CS major, of which only 30% of the students pass. But if you find you love programming like we all do and you have the aptitude for it, it's a fun degree and you get to do things most people go on to envy :D

-Shane

brad211987
06-29-2007, 02:10 PM
As far as when you can get an internship, I would think that will vary from the business and school you are at. You can always get hired on with a company without it being an official internship as well. What I did, is started doing sales for an IT consulting company, and now that has moved me into a place to learn some of the other things they do in the company. Now I'm doing java development, and working on a number of projects in the company. Companies like to have people that they can train up from nothing sometimes, as its more like a blank slate for them to train you the way they want. As oracleguy said, the interview can be the most important factor for you. If you can nail an interview and sell yourself well, you probably won't have too much trouble finding something at an IT company of some sort.


I also think web coding should become mandatory now in Computer Science, but it's not. Ecommerce is HUGE and I believe all CS curriculums should require at least one class delving into that world.

I couldn't agree more, Web programming and Ecommerace is hardly touched upon in classes, and its one of the most important areas to understand when you start dealing with businesses.

sage45
06-29-2007, 04:30 PM
Can I ask what school you're going to?University of Missouri, Kansas City
Also I asked them if Calculus was important for Programming and they said it wasn't. So is that true or are they lying and it helps a lot?As mentioned by a few people here, programming and mathematics go hand in hand.
I'm surprised your curriculum doesn't have a programming language class as a requisite.Actually Programming and Problem Solving I and II don't say it, but they are a C++ Programming Language Class. The rest of the classes, thus far, allow for you to choose between different languages for the coursework.
They just want you to have a strong mathematical background because mathematics and programming go hand-in-hand. But since I was taking so many math classes anyway for my major, I just finished it off with a Minor in Math. It was like two extra classes, hehe.I am too!!!! :D

-sage-

TheShaner
06-29-2007, 04:43 PM
Actually Programming and Problem Solving I and II don't say it, but they are a C++ Programming Language Class. The rest of the classes, thus far, allow for you to choose between different languages for the coursework.
So they teach you C++ in that class? I thought those classes were similar to our coursework for Computer Science I, II, and III, which required you to program in either C, C++, or Java, but didn't teach you those languages. You just used those languages to demonstrate the programming concepts you learned. UCF made it a requirement to explicitly take a C, C++, or Java class, and of course, you were suppose to take this class before you began any course that required you to program.

-Shane

sage45
06-29-2007, 08:15 PM
Yes, they taught the C++ language and concepts. To me, it was an extremely easy course (probably has nothing to do with the fact that I had previous programming experience :p). So far that is the only course I have had where they explicitly required the use of a single language.

-sage-

javabits
06-29-2007, 09:07 PM
Most community colleges that offer associates degrees will have transfer agreements with 4 year institutions. You should validate this with both the college you are attending and the one you plan on transferring to. Waiting until after you've completed your associates degree to figure all of that out seems like a bad idea. Being accredited really has nothing to do with transfer agreements so keep that in mind. There are usually limits to the number of credits that will transfer over, my recommendation is you want to get your general education requirements out of the way + as many lower division classes that will transfer over.

The other problem with FMU is that it was a vocational/career/technical college, a private for profit institution. These are generally good for gaining the skills but not necessarily the paper. When you go to the community can, 4 year colleges you get more theory while the vocational institutions are big on hands on.

I've always thought that CS Majors were held in higher regard than the CIS majors but that will probably only make a huge difference when you get your first job.

I've been working in the field for 10+ years and am currently back in school to get the paper. Note the paper isn't really necessary for me to get a job these days, it might open a few doors but I'm primarily doing it to set an example for my kids. Most people will look at experience, your skill sets, and whether you are a good "fit". So get the skills, experience, and brush up on your interview skills.

semper fi...

Shirosaki
07-03-2007, 03:10 AM
I know I haven't been around for the past few days. Was struggling to finish all my work up for school. I've also been trying to brush up on some basic computer programming information to maybe talk to the head of the department about to make sure he offers it and stuff. Everytime I try and go see him he's not around, so I haven't had a chance to confront him yet.

I'm still concerned about figuring out if computer programming is for me before putting time into this college instead of going somewhere else and maybe going into computer software engineer or something like that.

This school only has a computer science, emphasis on programming degree nothing else in computers. So I want to figure this out before dropping more money in their classes. If anyone could tell me how they figured out it was for them or maybe a book I could look for at a library to give me a basic idea what kind of thinking and logic is involved in it. Classes end this week and we have a week off and then school starts up again. This school has a weird quarter system.

I appreciate the help. Thanks.

oracleguy
07-03-2007, 04:35 AM
Well if you want to see if you can do it, try to pick up a little on your own. Get like C++ for dummies (or whatever language you want to try) and just go through a couple of chapters. You don't need to build these grand programs but it might get the ball rolling enough to give you a better idea on what is involved.

TheShaner
07-03-2007, 01:55 PM
I found out I liked programming back when TI-82 graphing calculators were popular, haha. I use to program little games on it and even had quite an extensive text-based RPG I created. So if you have a graphing calculator, you can get a small taste with that.

Another way to try some programming is if you have Windows XP Pro or Vista, then you can install IIS to get your own web server up and running, and do some ASP programming. It's not as complex as doing something like C++, but it's enough to give you a feel of what's to come.

And last, but not least, think about the type of person you are. Do you like math and logic? Can you sit in front of a computer for 8 hours and problem solve? Do you have LOTS of patience? Do you have the drive and capacity to constantly learn in an ever-changing environment? Answering yes to all these definitely put you as a good candidate at least.

-Shane

sage45
07-03-2007, 04:06 PM
You also have to be egotistical, hard-headed, eccentric, bone-headed and overly caffeinated. :D

J/K... Lub j00 SHANER!!!!

-sage-

brad211987
07-03-2007, 07:24 PM
I found that programming was for me, during a highschool java class. The book we used was "Java, How to Program 5e" and there are a 6th and 7th edition out now as well. I have the 6th edition in electronic format if you would like to take a look at that. I thought it was a good series for starting out, as they don't dive too much into the little details.

To stress what TheShaner said....you must have TONS of patience. 80% of my time is spent debugging the disgusting code I write :) It's a good feeling when the apps start to work in the end though!

Shirosaki
07-03-2007, 11:28 PM
Yeah I'll take a look at that book. It sounds like a good beginner book. I want to see if I can stay interested in this stuff for a number of hours. Do you need some kind of software to program? I only have windows xp home so I can't get that program someone mentioned earlier.

oracleguy
07-04-2007, 01:03 AM
You can download Visual C++ Express from Microsoft's website which might be easier for you since it is a whole IDE and compiler that works right out of the box.

There are IDEs and such if you want to do Java. If you buy a beginners book for a language, if it comes with a CD, they typically give you some software.

Shirosaki
07-04-2007, 05:29 AM
I downloaded the program. I'm looking at some of the things on it right now, but I think it says it assumes you have basic knowledge of C++ with the help files, but I'm still looking at stuff to maybe get an idea for what different symbols mean and stuff. I really have no idea what kind of thing I could program or try to program.

After looking at some sample program it kind of looks awfully familiar to this autoit thing I used to stay in an online game while afk. There were lines of code and it would click and do stuff a certain way to keep you logged in doing something you want.

Anyways I messed around with it after looking at it for awhile and like got rid of half the stuff and changed some of the timings on it to make it run more efficiently and the person who posted it was using it for the same function as I was. So this might be promising.

oracleguy
07-04-2007, 09:44 AM
I'd still recommend getting a book or reading through stuff on basic programming concepts because while you might do pretty well teaching yourself as you go, you might have a less steep learning curve. And books usually have ideas for simple programs to write.

Shirosaki
07-04-2007, 12:49 PM
Yeah you're right I have no idea what to type and what it would mean in the program yet. Its also kind of funny, but I have no idea what kind of programs you can write and what functions they can do, etc. :)

I just want to make sure real quick, is there any kind of popular series of programming books, from like beginner to advanced or something?
I'm looking at getting C++ for Dummies. It looks like it might be a good introduction to programming. I just want to make sure and see if there isn't something more well known and the best or one of the best books out there besides C++ for Dummies. If no one knows of one, I'll just get C++ for Dummies.

Sorry for all the questions I just like to make sure I get the best I can and try to be very thorough about it.

Edit: I'm also looking at this one C++ Primer Plus (5th Edition) (Primer Plus (Sams)) (Paperback)

Shirosaki
07-09-2007, 03:14 PM
Checking in with University of Central Florida. I had to leaves a message with someone to call me back. I got basic costs though from them.

Get this

$116.40 per credit hour at UCF

$299 per credit hour at FMU.

Not only is that bad but with most college degrees (UCF included) it seems 120 credit hours gets you a bachelor's. At FMU its like 196 or something like that. I really feel like I got hustled.

I also found out on UCF's website they have 2 different accreditations (can't remember what they are called) for their CS degree while FMU only has ACICS (which I think just means they have to find 80 percent of graduates jobs after they graduate).

I'm kind of venting, but I also think some people would find this kind of information interesting.

TheShaner
07-09-2007, 04:17 PM
Well, I believe FMU is a private school and so not publicly funded. Public universities will almost always be cheaper than private universities, unless it's one of those online private universities, like the University of Phoenix.

For a Computer Science or Computer Engineering degree and staying in Florida, UCF is your best choice in terms of education. Of course, if you're looking to cut costs, doing a community college for the 1st two years is the best route. Also, UCF is very hard to get into now, which is where an Associates degree at a community college comes into play.

And honestly, though UCF is known for its computer and engineering departments, if you were to get a CS degree at the University of South Florida, you really would be on the same level when applying for jobs and also have more money in the bank, haha. UCF's not prestigious enough to be a big factor like someone from MIT would be, so don't think UCF is your only choice. Other smaller public universities can offer the same degrees while being fairly cheaper and still the education you need to get your bachelor's degree.

Public universities have strict requirements for their courses' curriculum to meet the standards for degrees due to being monitored by the state, so I have a tendency to be partial toward them over private universities. You always have to be careful with private colleges and do a lot of research before enrolling, unless you're planning on attending an already well-known private university like the University of Miami.

-Shane

Shirosaki
07-09-2007, 05:05 PM
I see what you mean. Because I'm paying so much money I'd like to actually learn something. I don't want to pay 1200 dollars for a class where I learn almost nothing. I was looking at UCF's curriculum and you get to learn Calculus and Physics and stuff like that which is pretty nice.

Some of the basic general courses in FMU is just 1 course in college algebra, general psychology, us or world history, etc. Its just basic stuff that I probably already know. I know it will be harder going to a public university but I'd rather have a challenge than feel like I'm wasting my time in school.

I live pretty close to Valencia so thats always an option. I'm closer to UCF than USF though. I'm just not familiar with this area. I've only been here a year and don't know much about the school system here. I also don't remember learning much in school about different universities and how the system works, so I'm kind of winging it.

TheShaner
07-09-2007, 08:16 PM
Well, it's commendable that you're actually going through these lengths to secure your education. Most people wouldn't have even got as far as creating this post, haha.

Honestly, I'd say ditch FMU. If you have this much doubtfulness, it's not worth it at all. You want to feel like you're at an institution that will give you the means to better yourself and your future employment opportunities.

First off, are you considered a Florida resident? I'm not sure if you have family ties here or how long it takes to become a resident. Out-of-state tuition is a big expense.

Second, being near Valencia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valencia_Community_College), I would definitely recommend it. My brother went there for his AA and then switched to UCF. Valencia is a big feeder school for UCF. It's ranked 2nd in the nation in the number of AA degrees it gives out and 1st in 2 year colleges. I've heard nothing but great things about Valencia and my brother really liked it.

Valencia Quick Facts: http://www.valenciacc.edu/AboutUs/whoweare/documents/FastFacts.pdf

Third, at UCF or Valencia, you'll still have to do GE (general education) classes like history, economics, chemistry, etc. that you took in high school. That's mostly what your AA degree is anyway. It's GE classes with a couple classes that are geared toward your primary major.

Small world on living near Valencia. I'm about 5 minutes down the road from the East (main) campus. I'm off of Dean Rd between 50 and Lake Underhill.

-Shane



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