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View Full Version : Is this ethical?



bzzrd2
04-28-2007, 08:26 PM
I bought a PHP script about a year ago. I have now changed domain names. The software did not work with the new domain name. Emailed the writer. He says I must buy a new licence for both products and he will send me new files. It's not like I sold the site. Everything is the same with the exception of the URL. Is this a common and ethical practice with software vendors?

Mhtml
04-28-2007, 09:10 PM
Common? Wouldn't be able to say myself. Do you have any links to the license which you purchased it under originally?

NancyJ
04-28-2007, 11:44 PM
its not so dissimliar to a windows license - just because you own a copy of the software doesnt mean you can install it anywhere you like. Once you've installed it on one computer and registered it - thats that, if you change computer or even just the CPU (possibly motherboard also but the license specifically states cpu) you need to buy a new copy, your old one is just a coaster now.

It could be that the product you bought is on a per-domain basis. However it could just be that the problem you are experiencing is fixed in an upgrade to the product - if your initial fee doesnt cover upgrades then what he's really saying is that to support your setup you need to buy the latest version - or the compatiblity version for your setup, which isnt unreasonable. It really all depends on the circumstances. Without seeing the license and the product compatability info, its hard to say whether or not what he's doing is 'right'.

kewlceo
04-29-2007, 12:08 AM
That's the way some other licenses work as well, unfortunately. For instance, Invision Power Board is tied to the users URL, and once their support contract runs out, there's no longer a way to change the URL for the product license. Thus, even though a user may only be using the license on one URL, if it has changed, he's now subject to having his board shut down. I don't like this kind of thing, but it's a matter of "may the buyer beware" I'm afraid.

felgall
04-29-2007, 12:29 AM
It basically depends on what was in the original licence. If the licence allowed you to use it on one specific URL then you don't have the right to move it anywhere else. If the licence allows you to move it as long as you only have one copy installed at a time then the owner would have provided you with the information on how to move it without asking for you to buy a new licence.

bzzrd2
04-29-2007, 06:18 AM
It appears it's a domain license. It just doesn't seem right that the owner name is the same, the intent of the sotware is the same. All I have done is to create a new domain name. The files will not work on the new URL. The vendor has taken my information and has it under consideration. I see a lot of this going on over the net where coders are nullifying the software. I would never do that so as kewlceo says, "it's buyer beware" and I didn't pay enough attention.

kewlceo
04-29-2007, 06:46 AM
The real shame is that those of us who honestly buy software licenses are bitten by the protection schemes that are supposed to prevent unauthorized use.

</vent>

Good luck, bzzrd2, I hope they do the right thing for you.

Troy297
04-30-2007, 03:39 AM
Ya - basically what everyone else has said is the best advice... the license is everything :(

But unless the vendor's license specifically stated that you may only install the script once on one domain then you do have a "case" per say :S

Drakain Zeil
04-30-2007, 11:46 PM
Check the license you bought. Alawys check the license before hand aswell. It's worth seeing if you can negociate one.

ghell
05-04-2007, 03:54 PM
its not so dissimliar to a windows license - just because you own a copy of the software doesnt mean you can install it anywhere you like. Once you've installed it on one computer and registered it - thats that, if you change computer or even just the CPU (possibly motherboard also but the license specifically states cpu) you need to buy a new copy, your old one is just a coaster now.You know you can just phone them up and say that you have just upgraded your machine or completely switched to a new machine (as long as you aren't trying to use the licence on 2 machines at once or violating the licence in other ways), and they will sort it for you, right? If you have bought a 2nd licence in this situation, you have wasted a whole load of money.:rolleyes:

Usually you don't actually "own a copy of the software" you just own a licence to use it. In these cases there is nothing wrong with sharing your CD with someone else, for example, as long as they use it on their own licence.

kewlceo
05-05-2007, 08:16 AM
You know you can just phone them up and say that you have just upgraded your machine or completely switched to a new machine (as long as you aren't trying to use the licence on 2 machines at once or violating the licence in other ways), and they will sort it for you, right? If you have bought a 2nd licence in this situation, you have wasted a whole load of money.:rolleyes:

Usually you don't actually "own a copy of the software" you just own a licence to use it. In these cases there is nothing wrong with sharing your CD with someone else, for example, as long as they use it on their own licence.

Unless Nancy was referring to the OEM version, of course.



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